Healthy Carolinians of Jackson County works to improve the quality of health for all Jackson County residents through improved health services, increased efficient utilization of health services, and community empowerment. Charged with health priorities set by the community through the 2015 Community Health Assessment (CHA) process, Healthy Carolinians of Jackson County will improve the health of our community through dedicated individuals and agencies, strong partnerships, and collective impact.

Healthy Eating & Physical Activity
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Why it Matters?

Healthy People 2020 lists Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity as a Leading Health Indicator. Good nutrition, physical activity, and a healthy body weight are all essential parts of a person's overall health and well-being. Together, these can help decrease a person's risk of developing a chronic condition such as diabetes, cancer, stroke. etc. A healthful diet, regular physical activity, and both achieving and maintaining a healthy weight are tantamount to managing health conditions.

A number of risk factors are associated with nutrition, physical activity, and obesity. They include:

  • The built environment
  • Social & individual factors (Gender, age, race, ethnicity, education level, SES, disability status)
Healthy NC 2020 lists Physical Activity and Nutrition as a leading focus area for our state. Additionally, Cross-Cutting is a leading focus area for our state-- cross-cutting strategies are those that cut across various areas (health status, access to health insurance, obesity). Through evidence based strategies, our state hopes to achieve the following outcomes:

Physical Activity & Nutrition

Cross-Cutting

    Healthy Eating and Physical Activity has been a priority issue in Jackson County for many years, going by a variety of names. In the 2011 CHA, two priorities and action teams emerged (Healthy Eating and Physical Activity) to address this health priority. Action teams worked diligently to increase the percentage of Jackson County residents consuming five or more one-cup servings of fruits and vegetables daily and increasing the percentage of Jackson County residents exercising 150 minutes or more weekly. The Health Department partnered with a variety of other agencies and organizations to tackle these health issues-- Jackson County Parks and Recreation Department, Jackson County Department on Aging, Harris Regional Hospital, Jackson County Public Schools, Jackson County Department of Social Services, and more. With a collective effort, we were able to "move the needle," increasing the physical activity of Jackson County residents while keeping the consumption of fruits and vegetables among residents the same.

    In 2015, both primary and secondary data showed that physical activity and nutrition were still health issues in Jackson County. Community members used the following criteria to determine if physical activity and nutrition was a leading health priority:

    • How important or relevant is this issue?
    • What will we get out of addressing this issue or how impactful is it?
    • Can we adequately address this issue or how feasible is it?

    Ranking high on each criteria, community members determined that Heatlhy Eating and Physical Activity is a health priority for Jackson County.

    Cullowhee Valley Kindergarten students participate in the 2013 Healthy Snack Master Competition

    Progress Made in 2016

    [Guidance: The report should identify the actual efforts made for priority areas, not data. The state is looking to see that the priority was addressed through some initiatives over the course of the year. Identify activities, outreach events, policies, screenings provided, number of classes conducted, program participation, or other evaluation measures from your action plans. Quantifiable measures are the easiest way to show progress, but you will not always have numbers to include in your SOTCH report.]

    The following progress was made in 2016 on [insert health priority] in [insert county].

    • Example 1
    • Example 2
    • Example 3

    Progress Made in 2017

    [Guidance: The report should identify the actual efforts made for priority areas, not data. The state is looking to see that the priority was addressed through some initiatives over the course of the year. Identify activities, outreach events, policies, screenings provided, number of classes conducted, program participation, or other evaluation measures from your action plans. Quantifiable measures are the easiest way to show progress, but you will not always have numbers to include in your SOTCH report.]

    The following progress was made in 2017 on our action plan interventions for [insert health priority] in [insert county]. [Guidance: In order to make the SOTCH reports easier to review, the state reviewer has requested that the progress made on action plan interventions be separated from "other" progress made. Don't forget that even if you have not made any progress on an intervention mentioned in your action you still need to include "story" (e.g. program lost funding or not enough participants signed up.)]

    • Action Plan Intervention 1
      • Example of Progress
    • Action Plan Intervention 2
      • Example of Progress

    Additionally, the following progress was made in 2017 on [insert health priority] in [insert county].

    • Example 1
    • Example 2
    • Example 3
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    2015
    30.3%
    33.9%
    1
    -19%
    I
    2012
    13.4%
    8.6%
    4
    46%
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    What Is It?

    Providing educational programs at the Jackson County Public Library was identified by the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Action Team as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, has a reasonable chance of making a difference in fruit and vegetable consumption as well as weight status in our community. This is a new program in our community.

    The audience for this strategy are the community at large, especially those who use library services. Currently, the Jackson County Library has many programs in place (Ex: Storytime) that would marry well with a strategy such as this. Working within an existing program will prove more successful as a captive audience is already in place. This strategy aims to make a difference at the individual level-- working to increase individual's knowledge and influence over his or her attitudes and beliefs regarding healthy eating and physical activity. Implementation will take place at the Jackson County Public Library.

    Partners

    The partners for this strategy include:

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    Kids Yoga & Sugar Shock Education

    Action Team members visited the library to provide 2 yoga sessions for children and to teach a hands-on educational lesson on sugary beverages.

    February 1st - 12 kids

    February 7th - 18 kids

    Children participate in a yoga class at the Jackson County Public Library

    Community Gardening Educational Session

    Cullowhee Community Garden Manager, Adam Bigelow, hosted a talk at the JCPL on April 27th where he spoke about different aspects of the CCG and gardening in general. 2 people attended.

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    The partners for this strategy include:

    What Is It?

    Active Routes to Schools (ARTS) was identified by the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Action Team as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in physical activity and weight status in our community. The Community Guide for Preventative Services lists programs (like ARTS) that address street-scale improvements such as sidewalks, safer street crossings, multi-use pathways, and creating and enhancing access to places for physical activity as recommended strategies to increase physical activity rates. This is an ongoing program in our community.

    The audience for ARTS are primarily students, K-8, however school staff and parents will also be affected by the strategy as the ideals trickle into the classroom and the homes. This strategy aims to make a difference on the individual level through increasing individuals' knowledge and influencing attitudes towards physical activity and the organizational level by facilitating behavioral change by influencing organizational systems and health policies. Implementation will take place at the local schools and throughout the community.

    ARTS addresses health disparities and health equity by increasing access for physical activity for all students, regardless of socioeconomic status. Additionally, the strategy works to disband the perceived notion that walking to school is associated with poverty.


    Active Routes to School successes across North Carolina

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    Bike to School Day: The Active Routes to School Program led a Bike to School Event at Cullowhee Valley School on May 10th, 2017.  Students were dropped off at the Cullowhee Recreation Center, had their current helmet properly fitted or were given a new, properly fitting helmet to keep, and biked the trail around the Recreation Center and over to Cullowhee Valley School. 83 students biked to school, and with volunteers included there was a total of 101 participants. Students received bags with bike lights and fun, educational materials.

    Walk to School Day: Active Routes to School Program partnered with numerous community agencies to plan and implement the Walk to School Day event at Fairview Elementary School on October 4th, 2017.  The event began before school, and students were dropped off at the baseball fields below the school.  With the help of volunteers, students walked the WildWatch trail up to the cafeteria, where they were given free goodie bags provided by ARTS, Safe Kids, and FedEx, which included safety and educational materials.  This was the biggest Walk to School Day event in Region 1, with 263 students participating, 137 community volunteers, and 19 parents, for a total of 419 participants. 

    Sustainable Programs: The following schools have implemented sustainable walking programs:

    • Quarterly Walking Program 
      • Scotts Creek Elementary School
    • Walking Program 1 Day/Week
      • Blue Ridge School
      • Cullowhee Valley School
      • Heritage Christian Academy
      • Jackson County School of Alternatives
    • Walking Program 2 Days/Week
      • Smokey Mountain Elementary School
    • Daily Walking Program
      • Fairview Elementary School, Victory Christian School 

    Walk to School Day 2017

    2016 Updates

    Bike to School Day: The Active Route to School Program, with help from the Action Team, led a Bike to School Event at Cullowhee Valley School on May 4, 2016. Before school, parent dropped their children off at the Cullowhee Recreation Center. Children were fitted for a helmet and then rode their own or borrowed a bike to ride on the trail that leads from the Recreation Center to Cullowhee Valley School. A total of 150 participants were involved in the event.

    Walk to School Day: The Active Routes to School Program, with help form the Action Team, led a Walk to School Day Event at Fairview Elementary School on October 5, 2016. Students walked from the baseball fields, through the nature area and up to the school cafeteria. A total of 279 students and 150 adults participated in the event.

    Sustainable Walking Programs: As a result of participating in the Active Routes to School Program, all Kindergarten-8th grade Jackson County Public Schools have implemented a sustainable walking program.

    Bike to School Day at Cullowhee Valley School

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    The partners for this strategy include:

    What Is It?

    The Get Fit Challenge was identified by the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Action Team as a program that, when combined with other actions in our community, has a reasonable chance of making a difference in physical activity levels as well as weight status in our community. The Get Fit Challenge is an eight-week challenge that promotes better public and personal health through increased physical activity as well as lifestyle change. This strategy, though not evidence-based, has been implemented in Jackson County since 2011 with great success and participation.

    The audience for this strategy is the community at large. This strategy aims to make a different at the individual level-- increasing knowledge and influence on individual attitudes and beliefs towards health. Implementation will take place community-wide in Jackson County.

    2017 Get Fit Challenge Kick-Off Walk at the Cullowhee Greenway

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    Get Fit Challenge: With help from partners, the Action Team led the Get Fit Challenge with 443 participants and 65 teams. Participants are encouraged to get at least the recommended 150 minutes of physical activity per week.  The Challenge is 8 weeks long, from the beginning of September to the end of October.  

    This year, we had 3 free physical activity opportunities for participants, as well as the End-of-Challenge Celebration.  Action Team members also wrote articles for the Sylva Herald Newspaper about physical activity resources at the library, and hiking/getting outside in our area during the fall.

    The Kick-Off Walk was held Thursday, September 7th at the Cullowhee Greenway.  18 participants walked the 2 mile trail together. 

    Participants enjoy walking the Greenway Trail in Cullowhee at the Kick-Off Walk

    A free CrossFit demo was hosted by Catamount Crossfit on Thursday, September 28th.  7 participants were involved. 

    A free yoga demo was taught at the Bridge Park in Sylva by yoga instructor Marilynn Davis on November 19th.  6 participants attended and were very complimentary of Marilynn's teaching style.  The weather was perfect for an outdoors yoga session. 

    Yoga Demo participants practicing Shavasana at the conclusion of the event

    The End-of-Challenge Celebration was held on Thursday, November 2nd at the Cullowhee Recreation Center. BLANK amount of participants attended for a walk around the gym together and then the top teams were awarded prizes.  Superlatives were given away this year for Most Creative Name and Most Improved participant.

    ADD PICTURE


    2016 Updates

    New to the Challenge this year, participants were able to log their active minutes electronically through the Challenge Runner website or smart phone app.  The 2016 Get Fit Challenge experienced 490 participants and 74 teams. 

    Physical activity opportunities were available throughout the challenge and included a couple of group walks.  The End-of-Challenge Celebration was hosted by WCU Physical Education department at the Cullowhee Rec Center, where students put together an obstacle course for participants.  Press releases promoting the challenge and encouraging physical activity throughout the fall were submitted to the Sylva Herald.  


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    The partners for this strategy include:

    What Is It?

    The Healthy Living Festival was identified by the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Action Team as a program that, when combined with other actions in our community, has a reasonable chance of making a difference in awareness of community resources in our Jackson County. The Healthy Living Festival is an annual health fair that brings together businesses and organizations with a health-theme to offer information, screenings, and more to the residents of Jackson County. This strategy, though not evidence-based, has been implemented in Jackson County since 2011 with great success and participation.

    The audience for this strategy is the community at large. This strategy aims to make a different at the individual level-- increasing knowledge and influence on individual attitudes and beliefs towards health. Implementation will take place community-wide in Jackson County

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    Healthy Living Festival: The Action Team lead a successful Festival with 134 participants and 28 vendors. 44 volunteers completed screenings, which included BMI, blood pressure, HbA1c, cholesterol, HIV, Hepatitis C, and Syphilis.

    Charles Easton, ISAP Action Team Chair, speaking to participants at the 8th Annual Healthy Living Festival

    2016 Updates

    The 7th Annual Healthy Living Festival experienced 165 participants, 38 vendors, with a total of 76 exhibitors in the main festival space.  There were 40 screenings completed, which included HbA1c, blood pressure, height/weight, BMI, and cholesterol.  All screenings were free thanks to donations from Harris Regional Hospital and the Great Smokies Health Foundation.  

    Outside of the main festival space, the Red Cross brought their blood donation bus and receiving 14 pints of blood.  The Jackson County Animal Shelter was also present, and they administered 15 rabies vaccinations. 

    Jackson County Animal Shelter staff and volunteers at the 2016 Healthy Living Festival


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    The partners for this strategy include:

    What Is It?

    Tuesdays to Thrive was identified by the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Action Team as a program that, when combined with other actions in our community, has a reasonable chance of making a difference in physical activity levels as well as weight status in our community. Tuesdays to Thrive is a monthly health and wellness series that features timely health topics through a whole-body approach. This strategy, though not evidence-based, has been implemented in Jackson County since 2014 with great success and participation.

    The audience for this strategy is the community at large. This strategy aims to make a difference at the individual level-- increasing knowledge and influence on individual attitudes and beliefs towards health. Implementation will take place community-wide in Jackson County.

    A panel of experts on diabetes shares knowledge and experiences during November 2015's Tuesdays to Thrive

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    Tuesdays to Thrive: This program was taught monthly at various locations throughout the community-- Western Carolina University and Harris Regional Hospital, etc. Topics for 2017 included Substance Abuse & Mental Health, Healthy Heart, Physical Activity, Living Well Dying Well, Savory Swaps, and Diabetes Awareness.  On average, 20 participants attended each event.

    Tuesdays to Thrive participants work on physical activity at a past event


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    What Is It?

    The Healthy Snack Master Competition was identified by the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Action Team as a program that, when combined with other actions in our community, has a reasonable chance of making a difference in healthy food consumption as well as weight status in our community.

    The audience for this strategy is the community at large. This strategy aims to make a difference at the individual level-- increasing knowledge and influence on individual attitudes and beliefs towards health. Implementation will take place community-wide in Jackson County

    The Healthy Snack Master Competition is sponsored by the School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) and is open to all individuals or groups (i.e. classes, afterschool programs, clubs, etc.) in K-12th grade in Jackson County Public Schools. Students are encouraged to create an original recipe and turn it in to their school's cafeteria manager. Submitted recipes are reviewed by members of SHAC. The top student and group entries go on to compete in the Healthy Snack Master Competition. A panel of judges determines the winning healthy snack based on taste, appearance, healthfulness, and creativity. Superlatives are also awarded for the Best Bite, People's Choice, and Most Creative Name.

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    For the 7th Annual Healthy Snack Master Competition, 10 students participated in the competition. There were Individual and Group winners, with additional superlatives.

    Healthy Snack Master Chefs, with the panel of judges, at the 7th Annual Competition.

    2016 Updates

    The 6th Annual Healthy Snack Masters Competition received 17 recipe submissions.  After careful review, 12 were selected to participate in the competition.  There were 5 winners selected, who were awarded with cooking kits.  

    Snack Master chefs and judges at the 2016 competition
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    What Is It?

    The Cullowhee Community Garden was identified by the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Action Team as a program that, when combined with other actions in our community, has a reasonable chance of making a difference in healthy food consumption as well as weight status in our community. The audience for this strategy is the community at large. This strategy aims to make a difference at the individual level-- increasing knowledge and influence on individual attitudes and beliefs towards health. Implementation will take place community-wide in Jackson County.

    The Cullowhee Community Garden is a project of the Jackson County Department of Public Health. The garden provides space, tools, and materials for community members to grow produce organically. Each gardener agrees to donate one half of the produce grown in their plot to help our community food relief programs. There is no monetary fee for joining the garden, only the 50% donation.

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    Workshops:

    • WCU Biology Class - Garden tour & education

    Community Outreach:

    • Group Seed Order at the Jackson County Farmers Market
    • WCU Service Learning Fair
    • Assisted with Nutrition & Dietetics program at WCU to provide garden spaces and education at a local Head Start child care center. 
    • Co-hosted a seed swap event with the Southern Seed Legacy & WCU Anthropology Dept
    • Adopt a Pot fundraiser with WCU for children's space in the Garden
    • HIGHTS honey bee project - honey bee hive is now set up and operating. The honeybees are healthy and are already working at making honey, and helping with pollination in the garden.
    • 5 bee hotels installed
    • Presentation to Otto Community Development Organization on community gardening
    • Presentation at JCPL on community gardening
    • 4/5 water tank stands have been built in the garden

    Volunteers:

    • So far, the CCG has seen 415 individual volunteers throughout 2017 

    2016 Updates

    During 2016, The Cullowhee Community Garden hosted a series of educational workshops. Topics included fruit tree pruning and handling pests, weeds, and diseases in an organic garden. The Garden also hosted a seed swap and seed saving event at the Farmer's Market.

    Volunteers:

    The Garden had a total of 537 individual volunteers throughout 2016 – that is over $35,000 worth of in-kind donations of time to the Garden.

    Additional Information: 

    The CCG received a Service Learning Award for partnership with Western Carolina University


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    Partners 

    These are the partners who have a role to play in doing better.

    What Is It?

    The Power of Produce Club was identified by the Healthy for Life Action Team as a program, that when combined with other actions in our community, has a reasonable chance of making a difference in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, healthy eating, and nutrition in our community. This is a new program in Jackson County.

    • The audience for this  program are children in kindergarten-5th grade. The program aims to make a difference in individual behavior and impact families. Implementation takes place at the Jackson County Farmer's Market on Saturday mornings in July. 
    Updates

    2017 Updates

    The Power of the Produce Club (POP Club) was a new initiative in Jackson County during 2017.  The 3 sessions were held at the Jackson County Farmer's Market in Sylva during 3 Saturday mornings in July, the 15th, 22nd, and 29th.  Each session, participants completed a pre and post survey, participated in a hands-on learning activity relating to nutrition, and were then given $5 of POP Bucks to spend at the Farmer's Market. 

    A total of 42 children attending the 3 sessions (numbers are duplicated, as children were encouraged to attend all 3 sessions if possible).  Pre and post survey results stated that 21 children reported trying new foods that they liked, which included beets, lettuce, blueberries, and more.  

    The event was very successful and something the action team looks forward to planning and implementing in the future. 

    POP Club attendee discussing the texture of vegetables at a POP Club session
    Children drawing their own healthy plates, and taste testing fruits and veggies


    Injury & Substance Abuse Prevention
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    Why it Matters?

    Healthy People 2020 lists Injury and Violence, Substance Abuse, and Tobacco all as Leading Health Indicators. Motor vehicle crashes, domestic and school violence, child abuse and neglect, suicide, and unintentional drug overdoses are all public health concerns in the US. Additionally, the use of mind- and behavior-altering substances continues to take a major toll on the health of individuals and families in our communities nationwide. Often going hand-in-hand with these health indicators, tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the US.

    A number of risk factors are associated with these three health indicators. They include:

    • The physical environment, both in the home and the community
    • Gender
    • Race, ethnicity
    • Age
    • Income level
    • Educational attainment
    • Sexual orientation
    • Interpersonal, household, and community dynamics
    • Family, social networks, and peer pressure
    • Smoke-free protections available (Ex. tobacco prices & taxes, prevention programs, tobacco free policies)

    Healthy NC 2020 lists Injury, Substance Abuse, and Tobacco Use as leading focus areas for our state. Through evidence based strategies, our state hopes to achieve the following outcomes:

    Injury

    Substance Abuse

    Tobacco Use

    The 2011 Community Health Assessment identified substance abuse prevention as a health priority. An action team emerged and worked diligently to reduce the percentage of 12-19 year old students that reported the use of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco within the past 30 days. Over the course of four years, the action team saw a new health priority emerge in this field and responded-- we incorporated the Project Lazarus model into our action plan to increase the knowledge and awareness about prescription drug abuse, reduce the presence of unwanted medication in our community, educate the public about naloxone, and reduce the prescription drug overdose rate in Jackson County.

    During both primary and secondary data collection for the 2015 CHA, we learned unintentional injuries were a health issue in our community. Community members used the following criteria to determine if injury prevention and substance abuse was a leading health priority:

    • How important or relevant is this issue?
    • What will we get out of addressing this issue or how impactful is it?
    • Can we adequately address this issue or how feasible is it?

    Ranking high on each criteria, community members determined that Injury and Substance Abuse Prevention is a health priority for Jackson County.

    Action Team chair, Charles Easton, participates in a community event to share information about Project Lazarus.

    Progress Made in 2016

    [Guidance: The report should identify the actual efforts made for priority areas, not data. The state is looking to see that the priority was addressed through some initiatives over the course of the year. Identify activities, outreach events, policies, screenings provided, number of classes conducted, program participation, or other evaluation measures from your action plans. Quantifiable measures are the easiest way to show progress, but you will not always have numbers to include in your SOTCH report.]

    The following progress was made in 2016 on [insert health priority] in [insert county].

    • Example 1
    • Example 2
    • Example 3

    Progress Made in 2017

    [Guidance: The report should identify the actual efforts made for priority areas, not data. The state is looking to see that the priority was addressed through some initiatives over the course of the year. Identify activities, outreach events, policies, screenings provided, number of classes conducted, program participation, or other evaluation measures from your action plans. Quantifiable measures are the easiest way to show progress, but you will not always have numbers to include in your SOTCH report.]

    The following progress was made in 2017 on our action plan interventions for [insert health priority] in [insert county]. [Guidance: In order to make the SOTCH reports easier to review, the state reviewer has requested that the progress made on action plan interventions be separated from "other" progress made. Don't forget that even if you have not made any progress on an intervention mentioned in your action you still need to include "story" (e.g. program lost funding or not enough participants signed up.)]

    • Action Plan Intervention 1
      • Example of Progress
    • Action Plan Intervention 2
      • Example of Progress

    Additionally, the following progress was made in 2017 on [insert health priority] in [insert county].

    • Example 1
    • Example 2
    • Example 3
    P
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    What Is It?

    Project Lazarus was identified by the Injury & Substance Abuse Prevention Action Team as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in unintentional poisonings and overdoses in our community. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists Project Lazarus as a promising practice to combat unintentional poisoning mortality. This is an ongoing program in our community.

    Project Lazarus is a comprehensive community approach to unintentional poisoning and overdose prevention, addressing multi-levels of intervention (individual and organizational). This intervention targets patients with pain management prescriptions and their families, providers who prescribe pain-management medications, hospitals and emergency departments, and the community at large for education on opioid poisoning. Implementation for this intervention will take place community-wide.

    Project Lazarus Model, explaining the Wheel and the Hub.

    Partners

    The partners for this program include:

    Updates

    2017 Updates

    Medication Take Back Events:

    The Injury & Substance Abuse Prevention Action Team partnered with local agencies during the months of March and April to help host 2 medication take back events in Jackson County.

    The first event was held on Saturday, March 25th at Mark’s Pharmacy in Sylva. Partners for the event included Safe Kids Jackson County, Jackson County Department of Public Health, Mark’s Pharmacy, North Carolina Highway Patrol, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, Sylva Police Department, and Western Carolina University Police Department.

    Collection Details:

    Prescription (non-controlled): 14,774

    OTC: 28,400

    Unknown: 14,250

    Grand Total: 57,424


    The second event was on Friday, April 28th at Cashiers Valley Pharmacy in Cashiers. Partners for the event included Safe Kids Jackson County, Jackson County Department of Public Health, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, Cashiers Valley Pharmacy, Cashiers Volunteer Fire Department, and Mountain Projects Inc.

    Collection Details:

    Prescription (non-controlled): 6,865.5

    OTC: 1,198

    Opioids: 343.5

    Benzodiazepines: 244.5

    Stimulants: 68

    Community Presentations: ISAP is available throughout the year to do presentations in the community regarding substance abuse.

    The Action Team presented to the Rotary Club of Cashiers Valley on March 1st regarding the Community Health Assessment, Healthy Carolinians Steering Committee, Action Teams, and substance abuse specifically in Jackson County.

    Naloxone: Local law enforcement agencies in Jackson County are now carrying naloxone kits and are trained in its administration. Jackson is the first county west of Haywood to have officers equipped with the life-saving device.

    Media: The Project Lazarus website is updated monthly with meeting date/time, agendas, minutes, and ED overdose reports.

    Action Team news releases in the local paper include:
    Substance Abuse Prevention at the Forefront of Health Priorities


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    What Is It?

    Alcohol and tobacco prevention media campaigns were identified by the Injury and Substance Abuse Prevention Action Team as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in alcohol and tobacco use in our community. The Community Guide to Preventative Services lists media campaigns, especially those that are federally funded, as a best practice to decrease the percentage of adults who smoke or abuse alcohol. This is an ongoing program in our community.

    Alcohol and tobacco prevention media campaigns are a comprehensive community approach to alcohol and tobacco use, addressing the individual intervention level. This intervention targets tobacco users and susceptible teens. Implementation for this intervention will take place community-wide.

    Some messages in these media campaigns focus on health disparities. Ex: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Tips from a Former Smoker has developed messages that target a variety of disparities and minorities. Using tailored media campaigns such as these will increase the chances that the message is received in our community.

    Tips from a Former Smoker, a media campaign of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Talk it Out NC Campaign

    Partners

    The partners for this initiative include:

    Updates

    2016 Updates

    Media: Multiple articles were submitted to the local newspaper on free screening events, the alarming increase in Hepatitis C due to substance abuse, former Governor Pat McCrory signing overdose prevention legislation for naloxone, and substance abuse awareness month. Action Team members also went on the radio to address low risk alcohol consumption and to provide the Vaya Health emergency phone number to residents.

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    What Is It?

    Tobacco free policies were identified by the Injury and Substance Abuse Prevention Action Team as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in tobacco cessation in our community. The Community Guide to Preventative Services lists adopting tobacco free policies as a best practice to decrease the percentage of adulst who are current smokers. This is a new intervention in our community.

    Tobacco free policies (both adopting and enforcing) are a comprehensive community approach to developing tobacco free communities, addressing multiple levels of intervention (individual and environmental). This intervention targets the community, focusing on disparate workers and the public exposed to secondhand smoke in the work place and public places. Implementation of these policies will take place in the community, focusing on disparate workers and public places not covered by the state's smoke-free restaurants and bars law. By focusing on those disparate workers, we aim to address health disparities, supporting those in the most need.

    Jackson County Parks & Recreation Department staff pose in front of a tobacco free parks sign

    Partners

    The partners for this initiative include:

    Updates

    2016 Updates

    Well@Work: The county's employee wellness team met with MountainWise to discuss a smokefree buildings ordinance for county buildings. A sample ordinance was drafted and team members met with the Sheriff to begin approaching the subject of going smokefree in the county jail (the last building of county buildings to allow smoking in the county).

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    Partners

    The partners for this initiative include:

    What Is It?

    Balance classes (Tai Chi for Moving for Better Balance, Get Some Balance in Your Life, Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program, Walk with Ease) were identified by the Injury & Substance Abuse Prevention Action Team as actions, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in falls in our community. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Home and Recreational Safety Guide lists many balance programs as a best practice to reduce the unintentional falls mortailty rate. These are ongoing programs in our community.

    Balance classes are a comprehensive community approach to falls that address this health issue on a single influence level (individual/interpersonal). This intervention targets older adults with identified fall risks. Implementation of this intervention will take place in a community-based, small workshop setting such as the Senior Center with the Department on Aging.

    Participants from Get Some Balance in Your Life pose after playing musical chairs.


    Updates

    2016 Updates

    Balance Classes

    • Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program: 1483 participants
    • Walk with Ease Program: 384 participants
    • Tai Chi for Arthritis Program: 515 participants
    • Get Some Balance in Your Life Program: 112 participants

    Action Team members additional held a health fair and class demonstration for older adults to screen said adults into an appropriate balance class.

    Get Some Balance in Your Life participants and instructors

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    Updates

    2017 Updates:

    County Manager approved for county employees to take the class on county time.

    In February, 3 county employees completed the Freshstart Tobacco Cessation program.

    P
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    Updates
    P
    Time
    Period
    Actual
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    Value
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    Partners

    [Guidance: Who are the partners who have a role to play in doing better? Inside the organization/team/coalition? Outside the organization/team/coalition? What about customers?]

    Partners These are the partners who have a role to play in doing better.

    • Example 1
    • Example 2
    • Example 3
    What Is It?

    [Guidance: this section is an opportunity for you and your partners to tell the organization/team/coalition what you would like them to know about this program. The sample text below includes much of the information that you will collect to complete your state action plan & can also be copy and pasted from your public e-CHIP program/project/initiative of the same name.]

    [Insert name of program/project/initiative] was identified by [group/team/coalition] as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in [name priority] in our community. This is a [new or ongoing] program in our community.

    • The audience for this [name program type] are [name and describe target audience], and the [name program type] aims to make a difference at the [individual/interpersonal behavior; organizational/policy; or environmental change] level. Implementation will take place in [describe setting for program type].
    Data Holes

    We are keeping an eye on performance measures (How much did we do? How well did we do it? and Is anyone better off?) as a way of showing how this [program/project/initiative] is addressing [priority issue] and contributes to building a community where [name your result]. We have also identified other data that is not currently available, but that we would like to develop to help us monitor performance on this [program/project/initiative]:

    • Performance Measure 1
    • Performance Measure 2
    • Performance Measure 3
    Chronic Disease
    R
    Time
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    Actual
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    Why it Matters?

    Our nation faces a health crisis due to the increasing burden of chronic disease. In factor, 7 out of the 10 leading causes of death in the US are due to chronic disease while 50% of Americans live with a chronic disease. People suffering from these diseases like heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, obesity, and arthritis experience limitations in function, health, activity, and work which effects this quality of life.

    A number of risk factors are associated with chronic disease. They include:

    • Tobacco use
    • Tobacco exposure
    • Physical inactivity
    • Poor nutrition

    Healthy NC 2020 lists Chronic Disease as a leading focus area for our state. Through evidence based strategies, our state hopes to achieve the following outcomes:

    The 2011 Community Health Assessment identified healthy eating, physical activity, and substance abuse prevention as health priorities for Jackson County. Today, these priorities are still relevant. However, primary and secondary data collected during the 2015 CHA process indicated that Chronic Disease was emerging as an issue to note. During the prioritization process, community members used the following criteria to determine if chronic disease was a leading health priority:

    • How important or relevant is this issue?
    • What will we get out of addressing this issue or how impactful is it?
    • Can we adequately address this issue or how feasible is it?

    Ranking high on each criteria (diabetes ranked the highest of all health issues), community members determined that Chronic Disease is a health priority for Jackson County.

    Community members participate in an annual Stroke Risk Screening, in partnership with Western Carolina University, Harris Regional Hospital, and the Department on Aging.

    Progress Made in 2017

    [Guidance: The report should identify the actual efforts made for priority areas, not data. The state is looking to see that the priority was addressed through some initiatives over the course of the year. Identify activities, outreach events, policies, screenings provided, number of classes conducted, program participation, or other evaluation measures from your action plans. Quantifiable measures are the easiest way to show progress, but you will not always have numbers to include in your SOTCH report.]

    The following progress was made in 2017 on our action plan interventions for [insert health priority] in [insert county]. [Guidance: In order to make the SOTCH reports easier to review, the state reviewer has requested that the progress made on action plan interventions be separated from "other" progress made. Don't forget that even if you have not made any progress on an intervention mentioned in your action you still need to include "story" (e.g. program lost funding or not enough participants signed up.)]

    • Action Plan Intervention 1
      • Example of Progress
    • Action Plan Intervention 2
      • Example of Progress

    Additionally, the following progress was made in 2017 on [insert health priority] in [insert county].

    • Example 1
    • Example 2
    • Example 3
    Progress Made in 2016

    The following progress was made in 2016 on Chronic Disease in Jackson County.

    • DPP Class: This year-long class ended in December 2016. Nine participants graduated. Each participant lost weight and lowered their HbA1c significantly. Data was submitted to the CDC with hopes of the Health Department receiving CDC recognition for this program.
    • DSME Program: This program is offered at two locations-- the Health Department and Harris Regional Hospital. At the Health Department, DSME is offered at no cost. This year, 57 patients attended class with 83 total visits. Additionally, the program instructor received 45 referrals who did not show for their appointment. At the Hospital, DSME is billed to patients' insurance companies. This year, the program was offered through 7 classes, reaching 59 participants. The average HbA1c of patients decreased by 2.58 points and 88% of participants lost weight.

    I
    2015
    30.3%
    33.9%
    1
    -19%
    I
    2012
    13.4%
    8.6%
    4
    46%
    P
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    What Is It?

    The Diabetes Prevention Program was identified by the Chronic Disease Action Team as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in diabetes prevalence and weight status in our community. The Healthy NC 2020 Evidence Based Strategies lists the Diabetes Prevention Program as an evidence-based strategy. This is an ongoing program in our community.

    The audience for the Diabetes Prevention Program are adults, age 18 years and older, with pre-diabetes and those who have multiple risk factors for diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program aims to make a difference at the individual change level-- working to increase individual's knowledge and influence over his or her attitudes and beliefs regarding diabetes prevention and weight loss. Implementation will take place in community or clinical settings, like Health Departments, the local library, physician's offices, and more.

    The Diabetes Prevention Program targets health disparities. Often, residents of low SES are at greater risk of developign a chronic disease and being unable to manage said chronic disease. This program hopes to break that cycle by helping residents learn to manage their disease at low or no cost.

    Pre-diabetes graphic developed by the CDC

    Partners

    The partners for this program include:

    Updates

    2016 Updates

    DPP Class: This year-long class ended in December 2016. Nine participants graduated. Each participant lost weight and lowered their HbA1c significantly. Data was submitted to the CDC with hopes of the Health Department receiving CDC recognition for this program.

    P
    Time
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    What Is It?

    Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) was identified by the Chronic Disease Action Team as an action, that when combined with other actions in our community, that has a reasonable chance of making a difference in uncontrolled diabetes in our community. The Community Guide for Preventative Services recommends DSME as an evidence-based strategy that helps participants control the rate of metabolism to prevent short- and long-term health conditions that result from diabetes and to achieve for participants the best quality of life while keeping costs at an acceptable level. This is an ongoing program in our community.

    The audience for DSME is adults, age 18 years and older, with Type 1, Type 2, or gestational diabetes. DSME aims to make a difference at the individual change level-- working to increase individual's knowledge and influence over his or her attitudes and beliefs regarding diabetes management. Implementation will take place in in community or clinical settings such as community gathering places, recreational camps, worksites, schools, Health Departments, etc.

    DSME targets health disparities. Often, residents of low SES are at greater risk of developing a chronic disease and being unable to manage said chronic disease. This program hopes to break that cycle by helping residents learn to manage their disease at no cost.


    Counties in NC with North Carolina DiabetesSmart Programs


    Partners

    The partners for this program include:

    Updates

    2016 Updates

    DSME Program: This program is offered at two locations-- the Health Department and Harris Regional Hospital. At the Health Department, DSME is offered at no cost. This year, 57 patients attended class with 83 total visits. Additionally, the program instructor received 45 referrals who did not show for their appointment. At the Hospital, DSME is billed to patients' insurance companies. This year, the program was offered through 7 classes, reaching 59 participants. The average HbA1c of patients decreased by 2.58 points and 88% of participants lost weight.

    P
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    Actual
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    What Is It?
    Updates
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