Weld's Way Home

Weld's Way HomeComprised of 15+ organizations, the Weld's Way Home Collective Impact Workgroup is aiming to make Weld County a place where more households are attaining and maintaining stable housing.

These are the Weld's Way Home community-wide goals that no one organization can reach on its own.
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Why Is This Important?
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17.7%
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A community capacity building entity is led by United Way of Weld County to help reach the goals.
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What We Do

Found out more about the Northern Colorado Continuum of Care at www.nocococ.org.
More about Weld's Way Home

Ending homelessness takes the whole community. Our Northern Colorado region is committed to stabilizing individuals and families who are in a housing crisis as quickly as possible. The best way to assess their needs, find safe housing and provide services is through a continuum of care, so that homelessenss will be rare, short-lived, and non-recurring and all have the opportunity to thrive.

Continuums of Care (CoC) promote a community-wide response to ending homelessness. There are 400 Continuums of Care in the United States, covering every community in the country. CoCs are responsible for coordinating the funding and delivery of housing and services for people experiencing homelessness in its service area through U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department funds. The CoC also collects and reports data on the characteristics of people experiencing homelessness and their patterns of service use.

In January 2020, HUD named Larimer and Weld Counties as a fourth CoC in the state of Colorado. As the Northern Colorado CoC we have more local control, better data collection and outcomes, and have the ability to draw additional housing resources into our community.

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Download Program Overview (PDF document)
More about Weld's Way Home

The Coordinated Assessment and Housing Placement System (CAHPS) acknowledges that very few agencies are able to identify, assess, and assist people experiencing homelessness as well as to find permanent housing, help people move in, and support them to remain housed. The Northern Colorado CAHPS is a collaborative effort amongst homeless serving providers with three components:

  • Assess – Through street outreach, discharge planning with hospitals and corrections, and the provisions of overnight shelter and housing services, providers discover and assess people who are experiencing homelessness. Each household is assessed using a standardized assessment which generates a personal vulnerability score.
  • Assist – After the assessment is completed, households are included in a by-name list of those experiencing homelessness. Those with the greatest vulnerability are prioritized for housing as they are the most likely to die from living as homeless. Case managers continue working with those on the by-name list to meet their ongoing needs so that they will more likely survive homelessness. Through case conferencing between agencies, resources are identified and, as quickly as possible, housing is offered to those at the top of the by-name list.
  • Assign – As housing matches are made, case managers and other agency employees and volunteers assist CAHPS participants to move into and maintain housing.
Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 423 

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

A female that frequented the Housing Navigation Center presented with severe mental illness. Many had "given up" on her and her housing because she was so paranoid that she often didn't speak to service providers. After the Community Health Workers outreached and engaged with her consistently, we were able to house her with a CAHPS & NRBH resource. She now lives in an apartment by herself and her mental health is stabilized.

United Way invests in programs at other Weld County organizations to help reach the goals.
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Emergency Shelter Program and Services: Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, AWP operates the only domestic violence safe house in Weld County. In 2018, we served 298 survivors (165 adults/133 youth under 18) with 6,663 nights of stay. Our supportive services (e.g., Case management, Counseling, Legal Advocacy, Youth & Family Services, Support Groups) promote healing and guide progress towards attaining self-sufficiency. Additionally, our shelter programs directly address household instability and its root causes through:    

1) Housing Support, including emergency/triage services as well as information and referrals. $10,000 of our request will go towards helping 10 families with housing assistance (up to $1,000) to pay for deposits or rent. In 2018, 92% of our shelter clients requested housing assistance in needs assessments conducted at intake. However, our ability to provide assistance is limited due to lack of funds. Additional support from United Way would allow us to expand this existing program and address this critical need to help our clients quickly achieve permanent housing stability.

2) Employment Support, including help with job search, resume and interview preparation, job leads and employment referrals, and financial assistance for work-related expenses (e.g., uniforms, documentation, etc.). In 2018, 43% of our clients requested employment support. $10,000 of our request will be used to expand this programming by hiring a Part-Time Advocate who will focus on providing employment support to help clients secure or retain employment and maintain a sustainable income

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 1
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 201
  • Outback (Briggsdale, Grover, New Raymer): 1
  • Poudre River Corridor (Severance, Windsor): 2
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 3
  • US-85 Corridor South (Platteville, Gilcrest, LaSalle, Kersey): 2 US-85 Corridor North (Eaton, Ault, Pierce, Nunn): 8
  • Outside Weld County: 86 (6 Participants from Unknown in Weld Co)

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

Taylor and her kids came to A Woman’s Place after an altercation with her boyfriend. Taylor didn’t want her children to continue in the cycle of violence (studies show that girls who are exposed to domestic violence are 6 times more likely enter into abusive relationships; boys who grow up in homes with domestic violence are 10 times more likely become abusers themselves). Taylor shared that she had stayed at A Woman’s Place in the past when she was in a different violent relationship. As a result of the support and information she received during her previous stay, she was able to recognize the red flags and knew that she had a safe place to stay should she decide to leave. Taylor was on unemployment when she arrived; however, within two days of intake at the shelter, she began a new job. Her main goal was to save for an apartment. With help from A Woman’s Place, Taylor found a landlord who was willing to work with her less-than-stellar credit. Additionally, Taylor received financial assistance from A Woman’s Place amounting to her first month’s rent to set her up for success. Thanks to our donors, we were also able to provide her with furnishings. Within two weeks of leaving her abuser, Taylor and her kids were safe and settled into their new home.

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Carbon Valley Help Center (CVHC) offers financial assistance in the form of grants which are intended to keep our clients in their homes. The funds requested will be used to pay for a part-time Case Manager who will be hired to meet with and refer clients. CVHC is open from 9-3, Tuesday and Thursday and from 12-6 the 2nd Thursday of the month. All client debts paid by CVHC are paid directly to the landlord, mortgage company, utility company or auto repair shop. In all cases, clients will be directed to food access. CVHC offers non-perishable food and Weld Food Bank’s Mobile Pantry and the OUR Center in Longmont offers perishable food. All of our clients live in the Instability domain while trying to move up to Paycheck-to-Paycheck domain. Our financial assistance usually helps them remain housed. They are still experiencing household instability but have hope of moving toward increased household stability. In our experience over the past 2 years, of this program, clients are usually able to pay the bills until one unexpected expenses arises which jeopardizes their household stability, moving them toward homelessness. When our program started with a grant from United Power, CVHC made one-time grants of $1,500 or less to those who qualified. After one year it became apparent that some households were in need of assistance again, within 1 to 2 years. Since our goal is to reduce homelessness, the guideline is now one grant of $1,500 or less per year. In order to qualify for a grant, a client must meet with the Case Manager who will determine their budget and if they qualify for referral to our grant program. Sometimes the Case Manger will refer them to a more appropriate program offered by other non-profit agencies or government entities such as Food Stamps, child care assistance, LEAP and Medicaid. This is an evidence-based program which our founders copied from The OUR Center in Longmont. Our Case Management is modeled after their Case Management team’s use of the Arizona Self-Sufficiency Matrix.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 78 

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

A recent success story involves an entire neighborhood in our service area. Because St. Vrain Habitat for Humanity donated funds to CVHC to be used for financial grants in one particular neighborhood, we were able to help many households in that community who had never heard of CVHC and the assistance we offer. Habitat and CVHC shared grants 50/50 which allowed many more grants to be funded than would normally have been possible.

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For 32 years, Catholic Charities has operated the only all-population shelter in Weld County.  In 2011, we moved our operations into the Guadalupe Community Center (GCC) that provides comprehensive wrap- around services at one location.  Our programs have grown and changed, driven by community need and our physical capacity. United Way funds will be requested to serve existing and new programs as follows:  

Case manager/Housing Navigator Services and Support

  1. Support for the up to 60 men, women and families in our Transitional Extended Stay Programs with goals of employment/income, transitioning to affordable housing, savings and credit repair in under 120 days.
  2. Supports a newly enhanced program at GCC: Emergency/ Triage services and support for homeless families when no immediate shelter space is available.  Families stay in our nightly emergency shelter room until a safe placement plan can be made.  The Greeley Transitional House has the capacity to provide emergency stay for one family if needed.  The Emergency Collaborative Team (ECT) including shelter providers (GTH, AWP & Hope at Miracle House) and DHS work together to develop a housing plan for the family.  

New Re-Housing Fund: 

  1. Funds may include deposits/rent/utility fees with a goal of housing in 45 days.    
  2. Funds will be available to Individuals and families who meet determined criteria and are referred by a Weld County shelter or the Navigation Center Coordinator.  

New Housing Retention Services

  1. Monitors participants’ housing stability and provides support in a crisis.
  2. Provides connections to resources to enhance well-being & to support participants’ desired goals.
Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 1
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 151
  • Poudre River Corridor (Severance, Windsor): 1
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 5
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 2
  • US-85 Corridor South (Platteville, Gilcrest, LaSalle, Kersey): 1
  • Outside Weld County: 26

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

The Hospital to Housing (H2H) program, funded in part by the Weld Trust, provides resources that serve homeless patients discharged from North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC). Valerie's journey in the H2H Program began as the victim of a brutal home invasion assault. Valerie was attacked, beaten and stuffed in a closet left to die. When discovered by police, the trauma of the incident had resulted in a stroke that caused partial blindness, leading to a host of other serious medical complications. Tragedy followed Valerie soon after her discharge from the hospital when a caregiver family member unexpectedly passed away. Serious medical complications brought Valerie back to NCMC for an additional 14 days. Then NCMC referred Valerie to the Guadalupe Shelter H2H Program. Several weeks of intensive support soon followed. Valerie's Guadalupe Patient Coordinator and other staff advocated with medical professionals, provided transportation to surgeries and doctor's appointments, assisted in submitting applications for critical benefits, and helped acquire replacement identification documents. Valerie found the caring support and sense of safety she needed from the GCC staff. With financial support provided through the Weld Trust, Valarie has secured affordable housing and is reunified with her son Jack. Her service dog www.UnitedWay-Weld.org Benji is always by her side to alert her of pending medical emergency. Valerie has concurred much--with the support of multiple medical professions and the staff at the Guadalupe Center her needs were addressed, and she is on a path of improved health and self-sufficiency.

Weld-GFH
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GTH targets the very low income population.  Ninety-nine percent (99%) of the clients served are living at or below the federal poverty level (currently $25,750 for a family of four). The population served is primarily young, Hispanic (60%), single-parent families (65%) with very young children.  Most of the families served are Weld County residents (60%), with 40% of the families coming from other parts of Colorado or out of state; a growing phenomenon due to Weld County’s booming oil and gas industry.   
 
Our measures are evidence-based that Standard Case Management is critical to the success of the families experiencing homelessness as many have not had a stable home environment or learned the basics of being a tenant.  The Case Management focuses on Housing First, which includes coordination of support services for employment, childcare, transportation and financial management.  Since this program is a core part of the Greeley Transitional House program, not having this funding will impact the families we serve.  
 
The funding requested is to move families experiencing homelessness to instability at the house to stability as they move into permanent housing. The funding would support the shelter and assist with permanent deposits and/or rent.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 156
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 14

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

A family struck by COVID-19 and hospitalized have recovered. We successfully housed them with a landlord in our landlord recruitment program. They have returned to employment and should be able to exit our program by the end of the year.

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Greeley-Weld Habitat’s homeownership program serves the most marginalized Weld County residents with incomes between 30% and 80% of the area median income by offering safe and affordable homeownership opportunities. Habitat for Humanity uses volunteer labor and donated funds to keep housing costs to an affordable manageable 30% or less of a family’s income, allowing them to then have money for health care and groceries. 95% of Habitat families can discontinue TANF and other assistance. (Habitat for Humanity of Colorado 2018 Impact Study.) Habitat homebuyers are required to attend financial literacy classes, as well as classes in homeowner’s insurance and home care and maintenance. That, combined with protocols for dealing with delinquent homeowners immediately and with understanding and compassion, has resulted in the Greeley-Weld Habitat having only one foreclosure in 138 mortgages, an indicator of the great success of this program and its ability to create and maintain stability for the families it serves. GWHFH will fundraise above the amount requested to further subsidize the mortgage loans for our families.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 39
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 5 

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

The oldest son of one of our families received the Daniel's Fund Scholarship and began attending college last year. He spoke at our annual breakfast last year and talked about how before his family received their home, his mom would have to drop him off at a friends house early in the morning while everyone else was still sleeping so that the friend could help him get to school in the morning. After his family moved into their home, his mom did not have to work so much, and he was able to have a safe place that was quiet to study and do his school work, he was able to spend more time with his family and had a home where he could invite friends over and build real relationships.

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We currently provide cold weather shelter for homeless families with children under the age of 18, in effort to keep children in a warm, safe environment and off the street. We are open 24/7 from October 1 through March 31st.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 22
  • Poudre River Corridor (Severance, Windsor): 5
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 26

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

We had a mom with four children ages 3-16 come into our program last November. She had no clue as to how to get a job, let alone keep one. Her two oldest children were more of the parental units than she was. They made sure they had all the documents she needed, they took care of the younger children. They told the mom when she had to be at an appointment, etc. We started working very closely with the mom, teaching her that she needed to be the parent, and showed her how to fill out an application correctly. Taught her how to interview. We talked with her caseworkers about how to help them the best way. We collaborated with DHS and other organizations to help move them forward into being able to have their own place. This was not an overnight success story. They were with us for almost exactly 6 mo. Of course COVID 19 did play a big part on them being in our program so long. Mom got a job, we got all the kids enrolled in school, made it so they were going everyday and not just when they wanted. We helped mom get a savings and checking account, she saved a little over $6000.00 and we got them into their own apartment in June! We keep in touch with them and they are doing great!!

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One's ability to enter and retain housing in an increasingly expensive marketplace is correlated to one's ability to find meaningful, living-wage work. The entrance into that work, however, is similarly premised upon one's relationship to various social networks, one's credentials being recognized as valid, and one's ability to advocate for one's self in English. Obtaining employment in living-wage, middle-tier positions is challenging for newcomer communities with limited English-language proficiency and with foreign credentials not being recognized by local employers. Accordingly, many newcomers end up accepting low-tier, poor-paying jobs simply to make ends meet—this directly results in poor housing or desperate housing instability. So too, the pressures of these initial jobs taken, often in agriculture or meat packing, are so great that they prevent these individuals from being able to invest in the needed skill sets that would break that cycle. The Immigrant & Refugee Center of Northern Colorado is an ideal match for these communities, insofar as our programming offers an inexpensive, flexible, and specialized approach to these needs. Our organization offers freeor-low-cost instruction in English as a Second Language, GED preparation, or Citizenship preparation to our students five days a week across multiple campuses and time options for their convenience. Further, our team of Community Navigators, culture-specific staff who help clients in their own native language, meet with upper-level students to help those students pursue their vocational goals. This focus on workplace readiness is intrinsic to our educational programming, and that search for employment is aided significantly by our staff who are constantly seeking out new opportunities to place our clients in the vocation of their interest. Our educational method is evidence-based and strictly regulated by the Colorado Department of Education. Each of our instructional staff is appropriately trained and experienced in working with newcomer communities of various language abilities, skill sets, and life experiences.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 18
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 642
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 12
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 10
  • Outside Weld County: 8

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

One client, Amina, recently passed her citizenship interview. This tremendous accomplishment was the result of 3 years of study and commitment. This client, in addition to attending English classes 4 days a week, also attended citizenship preparation classes. Through a partnership between IRC NoCo and UNC, the client also worked with a speech pathology student to overcome some difficulties in enunciation. We are thrilled to welcome her officially to our citizenry; she was and is an inspiration to all of us in determination and perseverance.

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The Jobs of Hope (JOH) Re-Entry Program is designed to provide a “bridge” to guide and support formerly incarcerated or gang-affiliated individuals in order to succeed in their re-entry into the local community. The primary focus is on providing job and life skills training, although spiritual support and resource development are offered in order to insure household stability. The intensive eight-week, first phase of the program offers morning education sessions and afternoon job opportunities to provide an “employment incubator” environment designed to help the “apprentices” develop critical work habits and achieve sustainable employment with living wages.

The morning education sessions utilize a customized small group process derived from a variety of systems including the AhaProcess!, the Global Priority Solutions RoundTable Program (a curriculum which explores 40 character values in a self-discover process which has been proven to create personal transformation) in order to address financial, emotional, relational, spiritual and job related needs. The afternoon practical portion of the program creates opportunities for the men to work and gain income at JOH-supervised work sites with local businesses. This gives the apprentices the opportunity to apply newly-learned job skills like arriving on time and working well in group environments. The Re-Entry Program also incorporates spiritual mentorship, family support and fellowship, and professional substance abuse and mental health therapy (if needed).

The JOH Case Manager attends classes and job trainings as needed to monitor on-going participation and challenges, while also offering group and one-on-one meetings with the men in order to discuss their goals and progress. The Case Manager assists the participants with accessing community resources to help stabilize the household and address barriers that may be preventing the men from acquiring and maintaining employment.

After completion of the eight-week program, the apprentices are assisted in finding permanent employment and will remain on the Case Manager’s case load for 12 months in order to stay connected and provide support as needed in their continuing employment and future goal-setting.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 1
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 27
  • Outback (Briggsdale, Grover, New Raymer): 1
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 1
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 1
  • US-85 Corridor South (Platteville, Gilcrest, LaSalle, Kersey): 2

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

Domingo was born and raised in Denver, Colorado; he grew up loving the Broncos and having to look after himself and his brother.  His mother struggled with alcohol and his father was absent.  Domingo learned from the streets and by the time his mother found faith and saw her life changed through Jesus, Domingo had settled into a different life. 
Unfortunately that other life led to Domingo being unavailable when his mother passed from cancer and to a 30 year prison sentence.  But God was not done with Domingo.  In his first week in prison, Domingo’s grandfather sent him a photo that included the mayoral proclamation naming December 4th, 1993 “Charlotte Mae Herrera Day”, in honor of Domingo’s mother.  Before she died, Domingo’s mother was working on a dinner to bring Denver gang members together to try and stop the violence in the city.   After her death, it became apparent how much she had done walking the streets looking for her sons.  During that time she would meet other gang members and pray with them, something that earned her respect from the community.  Her family and community rallied together and put the dinner on in her honor.  That photo affected Domingo in a profound way.  He asked himself what am I going to do going forward and the answer he found was to work to improve himself, to live for God, and to honor his mother. Domingo says that the decision to live for the Lord was, “the best decision I ever made.”

Out of that pledge, Domingo quit the gang life and started taking college classes offered in prison.  He received a paralegal certificate, which was the catalyst to stop the heat from the other gang members.  The certificate proved to the guys that Domingo had left the gang life in order to improve himself, not out of fear.

Domingo is also very artistically gifted.  One of the guards would look over his artwork and encourage him in his drawing.  Eventually that same guard started a cosmetology degree program.  She pointed out that cosmetology would be a chance to use his artistic abilities and make money.  Domingo agreed and admitted that at the beginning it was tough, but he stuck it out and found himself really enjoying the work.  The look of joy and self-possession that would appear on a guy’s face after getting a good haircut gave Domingo an amazing sense of pride.

He also discovered that the stylist’s chair can be very similar to a therapist’s chair.  People talk while getting their hair cut and Domingo found a natural opportunity to share his story and encourage and inspire others to improve their lives as well.  Now Domingo has people from his old neighborhood coming to him and saying that they want to be like Domingo, because he did the hard work and is a respected member of society. He hopes one day to open his own barbershop and use it as an opportunity to share his testimony with the youth of the community. He strives every day to live for the Lord and to be the best version of himself possible.

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We are requesting funds to support Turn Around Bikes, an evidence-based program that collects gently used bicycle donations and hosts weekly Repair & Maintenance Workshops.  We teach teens how to refurbish bicycles at these sessions, then we donate the completed bike to an individual, family or child in Weld County who is need of reliable transportation.  We currently give away nearly 250 bikes per year for free to qualified clients.  Our follow-up surveys indicate that our clients use their bicycles to attain or keep jobs, show up on time for appointments (doctors, parole, case managers, etc.) and access support and resources that they would not otherwise be able to obtain without reliable transportation.  Each bike costs us around $25 to repair.  Our request is to fund the repair of these bicycles so we are able to meet this growing and vital need for transportation for our most vulnerable residents in Weld County while also providing education, training and volunteer opportunities for our youth.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 217 
  • Outside Weld County: 2

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

A local case manager secretly applied for a bike for one of their clients as a congratulations for completing something for her. The gentleman was so excited as he had no trasportation.

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Every 98 seconds an individual is sexually assaulted in the US equating to 1:3 women and 1:6 men being assaulted in their lifetime (RAINN, 2015). The Sexual Assault Victim Advocate Center (SAVA) is requesting funds to provide supportive services to victims of sexual assault throughout Weld County. SAVA’s services include: sliding-scale and free therapy in English and Spanish, free support groups for secondary survivors, group therapy, play therapy for youth ages 3 and up, a 24-hour rape crisis hotline, school-based prevention groups, advocacy and outreach, free community education, and peer leadership and mentoring. In 2018, SAVA provided services to 1,168 victims of sexual assault (an increase of 33% within the past year). Research demonstrates that the trauma that victims of sexual abuse have faced can never be undone, but with support the victims may become high functioning survivors and move from victim to survivor. Research also reported that through the “teaching, learning, and utilization of effective treatment methodologies, including same-gender survivors' groups, assertiveness skills training, art therapy, and family therapy, and EMDR” (Underwood, Stewart, & Castellanos, 2007), survivors can function, graduate from high school, maintain employment, and develop healthy coping mechanisms. The literature validates that when considering best practices sexual assault victims who receive immediate assistance combined with long term counseling will assist survivors regain sense of control, independence, and success in academics, employment, and relationships (Fernandez, 2011). SAVA employs evidence based practice in our work in addition to short and long term therapy to support victims of sexual assault. For counseling, our therapists are highly trained to employ evidence based practices to address trauma including EMDR, play therapy, and CBT (Chard & Gilman, 2005). In addition our advocates go through an extensive 40 hour training that address crisis intervention, advocacy, and de-escalation. SAVA is specifically applying for funding to provide supportive services that will lead to stability for victims and their families.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 24
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 246
  • Poudre River Corridor (Severance, Windsor): 12
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 5
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 19
  • US-85 Corridor South (Platteville, Gilcrest, LaSalle, Kersey): 5
  • US-85 Corridor North (Eaton, Ault, Pierce, Nunn): 10
  • Outside Weld County: 598

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

We met with Susan at a Sexual Assault Nursing Exam exam as our advocate was paged out to meet with them at NCMC. Susan was a victim of sexual assault from her husband and has been suffering from assaults for years. Our advocate provided support and resources for Susan. Susan was unsure if she wanted to report the crime to the police due to her safety, being a stay at home mom to three young girls and unsure how her husband would respond if she reported the crime. Susan worked with the advocate who found her resources for housing for her and her children, and then supported Susan in reporting the crime to the police. Susan has been working with a therapist at SAVA to address her years of abuse and trauma and is finding stability through obtaining new job skills and the ability to care for her children. 

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What We Do

The Mobile Food Pantry (MFP) delivers healthy, perishable foods directly to areas of high need with the use of a converted, refrigerated beverage truck.  Perishable food items are loaded on the truck at our Greeley facility and driven to the designated community where it is met by volunteers who help unload and distribute the food.  Currently the program serves the communities of Hudson, Dacono, Ft. Lupton, Frederick, Keenesburg, Lochbuie, Greeley, Evans, Milliken, Pierce, Windsor, Gilcrest, Kersey, and Mead.  On average, 200+ households are served at each distribution.  The truck holds 10,000lbs of produce, meat, and low-fat dairy and it provided over 2.3 million lbs of these perishables to 98,498 individuals in 25,279 households last FY.

Despite the fact that the MFP currently serves 15 different stops on a regularly occurring monthly schedule, there are still areas of high need that the food bank is currently unable to meet.  With the requested funding, WFB would be able to add 3 additional monthly stops to the MFP schedule.  Both Platteville and the Hill n’ Park area have requested MFPs.  In addition, Ft. Lupton has requested we add an additional monthly MFP stop in their community as there is such a high need.  Each MFP distribution costs approximately $2,500 in food costs.  The perishable products average 25 cents/lb and 10,000 lbs of healthy food is distributed at each MFP.  The food bank has been able to provide occasional MFP distributions in both Hill n’ Park and in Platteville, but has not had the funding to schedule monthly distributions.

The MFP addresses not just food insecurity, but also health.  Nintey seven percent of food bank clients report eating more fruits and vegetables when they access the MFP.  This is particularly important because 85% of clients report they purchase food solely based on price, not nutrition.  Last year in the U.S., food insecurity led to an additional $77.5 billion in health care costs.   The MFP program is evidence based.  

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 3,028

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

We met a 82 year old widow who is living on a fixed income. She told us she was skipping meals in order to afford her medications; medications she was supposed to be taking with a meal. She thanked our staff profusely and told them how grateful she was for the perishable fruits and vegetables, as she had not been able to afford fresh produce in months.

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What We Do

Women to Women is a source of last resort for women in Weld county experiencing a financial crisis. Our partner agencies submit requests via our web based system(WAM). The agency can request a one time gift for their client in one of the following categories: Auto Transportation, Child Care, Education Assistance, Health/Wellness, Home Improvement/Repair, Insurance, Rent/Housing And Utilities. Awards are limited to $750 and can only be awarded once in a lifetime.

Year-to-date (2019) the three top referring agencies are United Way (211), Catholic Charities, and North Range Behavioral Health. Top categories Rent/housing assistance, Auto transport, Health/Wellness assistance.

Each application provides a profile of the client and a detailed description of the need and the situation that created the deficit. The bill holder is contacted by a W2W volunteer to validate the need. When approved the check is sent to the bill holder. No monies are paid directly to the client.

The client receives a follow-up letter of encouragement that indicates the bill has been paid and with suggestions of how to ‘pay it forward’ that do not require money.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 4
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 167
  • Poudre River Corridor (Severance, Windsor): 4
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 6
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 9
  • US-85 Corridor South (Platteville, Gilcrest, LaSalle, Kersey): 5
  • US-85 Corridor North (Eaton, Ault, Pierce, Nunn): 2

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

This client needed a Rent Deposit Assistance. She was living in a motel in Greeley, after fleeing a severely abusive relationship. She is employed full-time and will be able to maintain the rent on a consistent basis. She also received Medicaid to cover her physical and mental health needs. We awarded $750.00 to cover a portion of the deposit for her to move in. Her life is now back on track.

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The Homeless Prevention Program is an expansion of a current program, eliminating the time and costs surrounding the creation of a new program.  Currently, Almost Home, Inc. provides rental assistance to those at risk of eviction or foreclosure.  Every household we provide with rental assistance receives case management to help with resource navigation (food assistance, job placement assistance, health care, etc.).  By providing this case management, we help our clients work toward self-sufficiency and avoid the possibility of being in the same financial crisis in the future.  Households with minor-aged children in the home may receive up to $500 in direct assistance, while those without may receive up to $350.  This is an evidence-based practice, as Almost Home, Inc. follows a Housing First model and uses a trauma-informed care approach to case management, which are considered evidenced-based best practices. 

Who We Serve
How We Impact
United Way itself offers direct service programs to help reach the goals.
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Download Program Overview (PDF document)
More about Weld's Way Home

The Housing Navigation Center (HNC) helps those experiencing homelessness regain housing and prevents those at-risk of homelessness from losing housing. Co-located with other nonprofits including North Colorado Health Alliance, Immigrant and Refugee Center of Northern Colorado, and Sunrise Community Health Monfort Family Clinic, the HNC:

  • Diverts people from homelessness by helping them return to support networks and avoid the homeless services system.
  • Assists people in getting back into permanent housing as quickly as possible.
  • Helps people maintain their housing.
  • Connects those experiencing homelessness with mental/physical health care, non-emergency shelter, and other long-term resources.
  • Provides essential services to help people survive homelessness (cold weather shelter, shower, laundry vouchers, mail collection, etc.).
  • Offers space to numerous homeless serving providers to connect with those they serve.

The HNC is part of a Weld County-wide Housing First strategy. Through the Housing First method, households regain housing and stability more quickly, get and keep employment, respond better to mental and physical health treatment, can manage chronic conditions, and more. Plus they stop over-utilizing the emergency department, eliminate law enforcement contacts, and don’t spend time in jail, saving taxpayer dollars.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 2
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 329
  • Outback (Briggsdale, Grover, New Raymer): 2
  • Poudre River Corridor (Severance, Windsor): 2
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 2
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 2
  • US-85 Corridor South (Platteville, Gilcrest, LaSalle, Kersey): 2
  • US-85 Corridor North (Eaton, Ault, Pierce, Nunn): 2
  • Outside Weld County: 288 

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

Veronica was a regular guest at the Housing Navigation Center. She had been chronically homeless on and off for years and was at high risk for abuse and illness. Veronica is 62 years old and suffers from extreme schizophrenia and paranoia. She would come into the HNC but would not want to work with anyone because she believed they were lying to her. The HNC staffed worked with her for 7 months before she began to trust us. The Community Health Workers were key in building trust with Veronica. When a resource for Supportive Housing became available through CAHPS, the HNC teamed referred Veronica for the apartment. Veronica was assigned the unit and the staff were able to get her to sign the paperwork, something that hadn't been possible for years because of her paranoia. Veronica is now housed and her Community Health Worker continues to provide wrap around services to keep her housed. 

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Download Program Overview (PDF document)
More about Weld's Way Home

The Housing Navigation Center cold weather shelter benefits guests by providing a safe, warm place to spend the coldest nights of the year. Without it, hypothermia, other weather related illnesses and injuries such as frostbite, even death, are potential fates for our most vulnerable neighbors. With adequate funding, the cold weather shelter is open from November 1 to April 15 each year and includes a dedicated space for single men and women, and the use of Catholic Charities Guadalupe Community Center for families. Each evening a hot meal and other assistance is provided, including regular presence from North Colorado Health Alliance staff who assess for medical conditions, provide basic wound, health, and comfort care and give referrals to Sunrise Community Health. North Range Behavioral Health provides mental health care.

As a part of Weld’s Way Home, a collaboration of 50+ organizations addressing homelessness and household instability, and as a service of the Housing Navigation Center, United Way provides oversight, general administration and fundraises for the cold weather shelter. Catholic Charities provides staffing and daily management. Other cold weather shelter program and funding partners include The Weld Trust, City of Greeley, City of Evans, Christ Community Church, Greeley Interfaith Association, the Weld Community Foundation, as well as numerous foundations, companies, churches, and individuals.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 5
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 550
  • Outback (Briggsdale, Grover, New Raymer): 5
  • Poudre River Corridor (Severance, Windsor): 5
  • South County (Brighton, Fort Lupton, Hudson, Keenesburg, Lochbuie): 5
  • Thompson River Valley (Johnstown, Milliken): 5 US-85 Corridor South (Platteville, Gilcrest, LaSalle, Kersey): 5
  • US-85 Corridor North (Eaton, Ault, Pierce, Nunn): 5
  • Outside Weld County: 11 

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

The cold weather shelter provided life saving shelter for a gentleman named Austin. Austin had been experiencing homelessness for 10 years and struggled with depression and substance use disorders. The cold weather shelter provided him with a vulnerable mat- a mat reserved for specifically vulnerable individuals- to insure that he would always have a mat. This extra peace of mind helped Austin work on his housing plan. Austin would come into the Housing Navigation Center during the day to work with his case manager to find housing, and stay each night at the cold weather shelter. Austin was able to secure a place and stopped staying at the cold weather shelter half way through the season, which opened up a new vulnerable bed and meant that Austin was now safe in his new home. 

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Download Program Overview (PDF document)
More about Weld's Way Home

The 50+ Weld’s Way Home collaborative organizations recognized a need for a more focused care model; in 2019,  United Way and North Colorado Health Alliance (NCHA) were identified as those best suited to address it. In 2019-2020, The Weld Trust provided funding to hire two Community Health Workers (CHWs) who connect Weld County’s  most vulnerable residents with housing and healthcare.


With a caseload of 10-15 people each, CHWs work exclusively with Weld County individuals and households experiencing homelessness or at significant risk for becoming homeless, primarily engaging in physical/behavioral health care management and housing navigation/retention services. The definition of services is intentionally broad; the primary goal of the work is a client self-defining what kind of support is needed in order to be successful in achieving their healthcare and housing outcomes and then assisting the program participant in achieving these goals. Another primary motivation for these positions is to provide continued support to empower individuals in self-management without regard to who pays for it. The CHWs work in tandem with an NCHA care manager according to a community treatment plan. The goals of the plan are highly focused on engagement with continued/improved access to health care, reduced morbidity of chronic diseases, reduced substance abuse, support to those with debilitating mental illness, connection to housing resources, and resources and referrals. At the same time that the CHW is focused on these health outcomes, they are helping the client get back into housing.

Who We Serve

2019-2020 People Served by Area of Weld County

  • Carbon Valley (Berthoud, Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick, Longmont, Mead, Northglenn, Thornton): 1
  • County Seat (Evans, Garden City, Greeley): 95

View most recent annual report for this program.

How We Impact

“Sally” has a severe and persistent mental illness and regularly sees delusions. Over the course of 6 months, the CHWs were able to slowly connect and build trust with her. As they learned more about her history and ongoing needs, it was clear that she was one of, if not the most vulnerable person in our community. In June 2020, they were able to connect her to a permanent supportive housing apartment, owned and operated by North Range Behavioral Health through the Coordinated Assessment and Housing Placement System (CAHPS). She still frequents the Housing Navigation Center, and the CHWs regularly meet her at her apartment to continue giving her support. Sally will likely always need support and thankfully, because of the flexibility of the CHW program, she will have it. 

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Download Program Overview (PDF document)
More about Weld's Way Home

The SingleCare Prescription Discount Card is a free card, available to anyone, that helps save money on costly prescriptions. The card can be used by anyone at any participating pharmacy in the United States. It can be used in conjunction with insurance, or on its own. All FDA approved brand and generic prescription medications are covered. The average savings is about 40% per prescription, and you can check exactly how much your medicine will cost at different participating pharmacies at www.singlecare.com.   

The program is made possible by SingleCare negotiating with pharmaceutical companies to provide prices similar to what they give large insurance companies and employers. SingleCare provides United Way of Weld County with the discount cards, plastic card holders, and marketing/outreach materials at no cost. United Way distributes these through 211, in campaign packets, to schools, agencies, businesses, doctors, and senior centers, and to anyone who requests them.

Who We Serve
How We Impact
The activity domains and near-term measures create synergy and a sense of shared progress.
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