Health

Public Health
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Baseline
% Change
Why Is This Important?

Immunization protects community health in multiple ways: immunized individuals are protected from disease; if the community is immunized, the target disease is minimized or eradicated; and those who have weak immune systems or cannot be vaccinated due to medical reasons are protected in an immunized community. Children are more vulnerable and prone to illness than healthy adults due to their immature immune systems. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends young children should be fully immunized against Polio, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Whooping Cough), Tetanus, Measles, Mumps, and Rubella, Varicella (Chicken Pox), Haemophilus Influenza Type B, Hepatitis A, and Hepatitis B. http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=hsc&group=120001-121000&file=120325-120380

How are we doing?

Of the total 333 kindergarteners enrolled in the Tahoe/Truckee Joint Unified School District (TTUSD) in the 2011/12 school year, 66% had records of completion for all required immunizations. This is a reduction from 2006, when 70% were fully immunized. In the same year, 94% of kindergarteners were fully immunized in the California public school system. Children who lack one or more required vaccine doses in a series that are not currently due may be admitted with the requirement that they receive the remaining doses when due (noted as conditional entrants in the table). At TTUSD, XX% percent (98 students) of kindergarteners fall into the population of “conditional entrants. Conditional entrants can include children who did not receive their vaccinations by the recommended age or children who do not have their immunization records available and must begin their vaccinations again. Children with “conditional entrant” status may be vulnerable to infectious diseases while they wait for the next series of shots.

Parents may delay or refuse immunizations for their children due to religious or personal beliefs. Also, some children can't get their shots due to health problems.

By law, students may be denied entry into the school system if immunizations are not up to date. The challenge of ensuring that conditional entrants receive the remaining doses of their vaccinations is currently placed on TTUSD staff. Ideally, 100% of children would be fully immunized prior to entry into the TTUSD school system to protect their health and the health of the Tahoe/Truckee community.

I
SY 2016
87.0%
24%
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Baseline
% Change
Why Is This Important?

Lifestyle patterns (what you eat, exercise level, tobacco use, etc.) usually begin in childhood. Unhealthy body composition, which is the percentage of fat to muscle mass and bone, is a contributing factor to chronic disease. By maintaining an active lifestyle, eating healthfully, and avoiding substance abuse, one can dramatically reduce the risk of developing a chronic disease.

How are we doing?

Tahoe/Truckee students are more likely to have a healthy body composition when compared to Placer County and California (30.9% versus 26% and 38% respectively). However, children claiming Hispanic or Latino ethnicity tend to be approximately ten percent more likely to be in the unhealthy zone for body composition in the 5th grade (26% versus 37%). (http://www.kidsdata.org/region/1053/tahoe-truckee-joint-unified/results#cat=44&say=317&pf=1)

Health Care Access and Insurance
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Baseline
% Change
How are we doing?
Why Is This Important?
Dental
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Baseline
% Change
Why Is This Important?
How are we doing?
What is this indicator?
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Baseline
% Change
What We Do

In 2011 Tahoe Forest Health System conducted it's first Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) which engaged key stakeholders and community members to describe the health of local people, identify use of local health care services, identify community needs and distinguish action needed to address the future delivery of health care in the region. The 2011 CHNA identified 5 goals as health priorities:

  • Access to Primary Care
  • Immunizations
  • Ethnic Disparities
  • Mental Health
  • Substance Abuse

The Wellness Neighborhood was established in 2012 to provide architecture for community health programming that focused on the 5 goals established in 2011 and expanded upon them to include Dental Care and Chronic Disease Management. The 2014 CHNA showed positive health trends as well as a need to continue community and health programming. The 2011 CHNA goals and the 2012 Wellness Neighborhood evolved in 2015 to their current focus:

  • Optimizing Health and Primary/Preventive Health
  • Substance Abuse
  • Mental and Behavioral Health
  • Access to Care and Care Coordination
Who We Serve
How We Impact

The Wellness Neighborhood builds off the theory that change is most likely to occur when core community organizations and leaders respond to calls to action and align their actions toward common results. This theory, referred to as Collective Impact, involves collaboration between TFHS and community organizations through design and alignment of priority issues, evaluation and tracking of improvements. Partnered organizations have a common agenda, shared measurement systems, mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication between partners and the public and perhaps most importantly a backbone of support organizations aligned with community non-profits.

https://www.tfhd.com/wellness-...

Substance Abuse
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Baseline
% Change
Why Is This Important?
How are we doing?
I
2017
28.3%
31%
I
2016
10%
400%
Mental Health
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Baseline
% Change
Partners
Why Is This Important?

According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), in any given year, an estimated 13 million American adults (approximately 1 in 17) have a seriously debilitating mental illness.1, 2

Mental health disorders are the leading cause of disability in the United States and Canada, accounting for 25 percent of all years of life lost to disability and premature mortality.

I
2017
3.3%
-58%
Scorecard Result Program Indicator Performance Measure Action Actual Value Target Value Tag S R I P PM A m/d/yy m/d/yyyy