The New Mexico Department of Health Results Scorecard shows the progress we made toward a Healthier New Mexico during fiscal year 2018 (FY18), quarter 2 (Q2). You can use this Scorecard to learn about the actions we are taking to carry out our Strategic Plan. The Scorecard shows what we are doing and how well we are doing it.

A Result (R) is the condition of well-being we desire for the population of New Mexico. An Indicator (I) helps us measure the desired Result in the population. A Program (P) is an organizational unit in our agency that helps us reach the desired Results. A Performance Measure (PM) helps us measure how well a Program is contributing to population health.

Time Period describes the most recent period for which data are available. The Actual Value, Target Value, and Current Trend are for the Time Period shown. Actual Values may show a background color. Green means we met the Target Value. Yellow means we were close to the Target Value. Red means we did not meet the Target Value. The Current Trend shows whether we have been getting better or worse. A green arrow shows the trend is moving in the direction we desire, a red arrow shows the trend is moving away from our desired target, and a black arrow shows that the trend is staying the same. The number next to the arrow shows how many periods in a row the trend has been in the same direction.

FY18 STRATEGIC PLAN RESULT 1
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Why Is This Important?
I
2017
186.7 per 1,000
185.5 per 1,000
2
I
2015
11.4%
13.5%
2
I
2016
16.6%
2
I
2016
24.8 per 100,000
25.9 per 100,000
1
I
2016
66.0 per 100,000
58.5 per 100,000
3
I
2016
91.6 per 100,000
96.1 per 100,000
1
I
2016
921 per 100,000
475 per 100,000
0
I
2016
22.2 per 100,000
20.7 per 100,000
1
I
2016
14.4 per 100,000
15.0 per 100,000
1
PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Public Health Division (PHD) fulfills the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) mission by working with individuals, families, communities and partners to improve health, eliminate disparities, respond to health threats, and ensure timely access to quality, culturally competent health care.

Who We Serve

The Public Health Division serves all New Mexicans.   

How We Impact

PHD staff members implement evidence based public health interventions and promote healthy lifestyle choices that reduce the burden of chronic and infectious disease in our communities. Public Health assures access to health care through case management, and through recruitment and retention efforts including the J-1 Visa Program, licensing of midwives and community health workers, tax credits for  rural health providers, and collaboration with rural primary health care providers throughout the state.

Budget

FY18 OPERATING BUDGET: $ 181,331,100

  • General Funds: $ 49,846,500
  • Other Transfers: $ 16,839,500
  • Federal Funds: $ 72,078,100
  • Other State Funds: $ 42,567,000
Accomplishments

During the second quarter of FY18, some of PHD’s accomplishments included:

  • Children's Medical Services in the Southeast region hosted 15 clinics from October 1, 2017-December 31, 2017.  Total clients seen were 165.  The show rate for outreach clinics during the second quarter was 85%.  The clinics that we hosted were Asthma, Cleft Palate, Endocrine, Genetics, GI, Metabolic, Neuro, and Nephrology.
  • PHD Emergency Preparedness Specialists: Coordinated with De Baca Family Practice in planning and evaluating De Baca Family Practice Clinic full scale exercise in Ft. Sumner. The full-scale exercise tested medical surge capacity within the community.  
  • Active Shooter training was conducted at the Artesia and Carlsbad Health Offices.  Public Health staff received training from Artesia Police and the Eddy County Sheriff’s Department. 
  • Twenty-five people in the Southeast region attended a six-week diabetes self-management course provided by PHD staff. 
  • The first behavioral health telemedicine, medication assisted treatment sessions between the Las Cruces and Truth or Consequences Public Health Offices took place in December.  
  • 3,932 people participated in Las Cruces Public Schools International Walk To School Day during the first week of October.
  • In Otero county in October, Prescription Drugs Overdose Prevention Strategies (PDOPS) organized the training of 89 officers to use Narcan and coordinated obtaining narcan prescriptions for Alamogordo Police, Tularosa Police, and Otero County Sherriff's officers.  
  • Agencies from Doña Ana and Otero Counties merged to form the Chaparral Youth Committee to address lack of programs for youth and address current issues with substance abuse.              


 



EPIDEMIOLOGY AND RESPONSE DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Epidemiology and Response Division (ERD) monitors health, provides health information, prevents disease and injury, promotes health and healthy behaviors, responds to public health events, prepares for health emergencies, and provides emergency medical, trauma, vital registration, and sexual assault-related services to New Mexicans.

Who We Serve

ERD serves all New Mexicans, particularly those at risk for injury, disease, and health emergencies, and those in need of emergency medical services, trauma care, birth certificates, and death certificates.

How We Impact

ERD provides services through six bureaus: Vital Records and Health Statistics (VRHS), Health Emergency Management (BHEM), Emergency Medical Systems (EMS), Environmental Health Epidemiology (EHEB), Infectious Disease Epidemiology (IDEB), and Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology (IBEB). In addition, the Community Health Assessment Program (CHAP) operates the online NM Indicator-Based Information System (IBIS) providing data on numerous health-related measures; and the Health Systems Epidemiology Program (HSEP) analyzes and disseminates hospitalization and emergency department data.

VRHS annually registers approximately 26,000 births and 17,000 deaths, and issues over 250,000 birth and death certificates. VRHS also analyzes and distributes data to numerous agencies and organizations to assist them in improving the health of New Mexicans. By working at the state, regional, and local levels through public and private partnerships BHEM enables New Mexicans to prevent, detect, report, respond to, and recover from health-related emergency and disaster incidents. The EMS Bureau administers the Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Trauma, and Stroke/STEMI (Heart Attack) programs. EMS assures licensure for over 8,000 NM Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs).

EHEB conducts surveillance on conditions associated with environmental exposures (e.g. drinking water, air, and soil), provides information to other programs and the public, and implements interventions. IDEB performs surveillance for notifiable infectious diseases and conducts epidemiologic field investigations associated with those diseases, investigating over 10,000 potential cases each year. IDEB and EHEB also provide an on call service, responding to over 5,000 calls annually from healthcare providers, state agencies, educational facilities, the general public, and others seeking advice and recommendations. IBEB analyzes alcohol- and drug-related public health problems; supports substance abuse prevention programs and policy initiatives; provides injury prevention services for infants, children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly; and conducts studies in injury epidemiology. IBEB also conducts the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System annual survey of about 9,000 adults as well as the Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey of about 30,000 mid- and high school students to provide state, county, and school district level data on risk behaviors and resiliency factors.

Budget

FY18 OPERATING BUDGET: $28,188,700

  • General Funds: $12,002,700
  • Other Transfers: $766,200
  • Federal Funds: $15,012,100
  • Other State Funds: $407,700
Accomplishments
During the second quarter of FY18, some of ERD’s accomplishments included:
  • The older adult falls death rate decreased 12 percent in 2016 to 91.6 deaths/100,000 at the same time the number of health care providers and older adults trained in evidence based fall prevention approaches has increased substantially.
  • New Mexico's drug overdose death rate dropped from 8th highest to 12th in 2016.
  • Using federal funding for Zika prevention and detection, birth defects surveillance has been made much more comprehensive with increased services to families with birth defects.
  • A new trauma center, the first in Doña Ana County, was designated.
  • With an early start the influenza season, 10 outbreaks in long term care centers were investigated and, as a result, recommendations for control were provided.
  • Crisis standards of care are being developed to increase the number of tools available to be used in a major public health emergency.
  • Emergency department syndromic surveillance uses are expanding to tracking non-fatal overdose, suicide attempts, and influenza.
  • Program evaluation capacity is being enhanced largely through federal funding.
  • The number and percentage of retail pharmacies that dispense naloxone has increased substantially to 236 (61%).


SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Scientific Laboratory Division (SLD) provides laboratory analysis and scientific expertise for public health policy development, environment, and toxicology programs in New Mexico (NM). SLD provides timely identification in order to prevent, identify, and respond to threats to public health and safety from emerging and unusual infectious diseases in humans, animals, water, food, and dairy, as well as chemical and radiological hazards in drinking water systems and environmental water, air, and soil. In addition, the laboratory performs drug testing and provides expert witness testimony for forensic investigations of DWI/DUID and cause of death from drugs and infectious disease. SLD is the primacy bioterrorism and chemical terrorism response laboratory for the state and provides training for clinical laboratories throughout New Mexico. 

Who We Serve

New Mexico statute dictates that the Scientific Laboratory Division is the primacy laboratory for the New Mexico Department of Health, the New Mexico Environment Department, and the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, as well as the testing and regulatory authority for impaired driving testing.

How We Impact

The Scientific Laboratory is New Mexico’s official public health, environmental monitoring, and forensic toxicology laboratory. In the above roles, the Scientific Laboratory Division operates the following programs:

  • Infectious disease reference testing laboratory for the New Mexico Department of Health, NM hospitals, and clinical labs;
  • Primacy NM regulatory drinking water testing laboratory for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and NM Environment Department;
  • Regulatory air testing laboratory for NM Environment Department and City of Albuquerque;
  • Primacy NM regulatory dairy testing laboratory for the Food and Drug Administration and NM Department of Agriculture;
  • Veterinary infectious disease reference testing laboratory for the NM Department of Agriculture’s Veterinary Diagnostic Services;
  • Food borne infectious disease testing laboratory;
  • Certification inspectors for private dairy and dairy testing laboratories for the NM Environment Department and the NM Department of Agriculture;
  • DWI/DUID alcohol and drug testing laboratory;
  • State toxicology expert witnesses for DWI/DUID criminal cases;
  • Certifying authority for NM law enforcement officers for breath alcohol testing;
  • Bio- and chemical terrorism response laboratory for New Mexico;
  • Disease and drug testing laboratory for the NM Office of the Medical Examiner.
Budget

FY18 OPERATING BUDGET: $ 12,904,200

  • General Funds:      $7,599,600
  • Other Transfers:    $1,251,100
  • Federal Funds:       $2,646,000
  • Other State Funds: $1,407,500
Accomplishments

During the second quarter of FY18, some of SLD’s accomplishments included:

  • Although the Drug Screening Section Supervisor position was vacated during this quarter, the number of cases reported within the 15 day turn-around time was doubled (from 22% to 45%).
  • The request perform Mercury by EPA method 200.8 was submitted to the EPA. The request included the submission of analytical data, proficiency test results, and method detection limit studies. The addition of this method will improve result turnaround times, particularly for compliance drinking water samples, and will have the added benefit of a slight cost reduction for the NM Environment Department Drinking Water Bureau.


OFFICE OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Office of Facilities Management (OFM) fulfills the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) mission by providing:

  • Programs in mental health, substance abuse, long-term care, and physical rehabilitation in both facility and community-based settings;
  • Safety net services throughout New Mexico.
Who We Serve

OFM oversees five healthcare facilities and one community program. Most individuals served by NMDOH facilities have either complex medical conditions or psychiatric disorders that manifest in violent behaviors, and private sector providers are either unable or unwilling to serve these complex individuals, many of whom are restricted to NMDOH facilities by court order.

How We Impact

OFM Facility staff cares for both New Mexico adult and adolescent residents, who need continuous care 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a year as well as provision of a variety of behavioral health outpatient services.

Accomplishments

During the second quarter of FY18, some of OFM’s accomplishments included:

  • Turquoise Lodge Hospital:
    • Celebrated 65 years of recovery services in New Mexico.
    • Opened an Intensive Outpatient Treatment (IOP) program.
    • Conducted 238 admissions into Detox and Rehab programs.
    • Maintained an 87.2% occupancy rate in the Hospital.
    • Provided Professionalism training to 98% of its staff.
  • New Mexico Behavioral Health Institute:
    •  Completed its tri-annual Joint Commission survey.
    •  Celebrated its 125th anniversary.
  • Fort Bayard Medical Center:
    • Filled 21 direct care positions from recent direct hire event.


Budget

FY18 OPERATING BUDGET: $124,072,300

  • General Funds: $58,125,800
  • Other Transfers: $1,118,200
  • Federal Funds: $3,992,400
  • Other State Funds: $60,835,900
PM
FY 2017
24.0%
10.0%
0
PM
FY 2018
81.7%
90.0%
1
DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES SUPPORTS DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do
The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) effectively administers a system of person-centered community supports and services that promotes positive outcomes for all stakeholders.
Who We Serve

DDSD is the primary state agency that funds community services and supports for people with disabilities and their families in New Mexico.

How We Impact

DDSD's primary focus is on assisting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families in exercising their right to make choices, grow and contribute to their community.

Budget

FY18 OPERATING BUDGET: $159,443,800

  • General Funds: $146,264,200
  • Other Transfers: $8,760,400
  • Federal Funds: $2,819,200
  • Other State Funds: $1,600,000
Accomplishments

During the second quarter of FY18, some of DDSD’s accomplishments included:

  • The Family Infant Toddler (FIT) program completed work under the Race To the Top - Early Learning Challenge grant, which included development of a Tiered Quality Rating and Improvement System known as FOCUS, that promotes evidence based practices in early intervention through the use of video for reflection and practice-based coaching.   In addition, development of a Early Childhood Integrated Data System (ECIDS) in partnership with the Public Education Division (PED) and the Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD) was included as well.
  • The PASRR (Pre-Admission Screen and Resident Review) unit completed its first quarter with the assistance of two student interns. Having interns, plus filling the PASRR Social Worker position, has provided the opportunity to become current with PASRR Level I Screens and Level II Evaluations.
  • DDSD continues to make progress with the Client Data Management System.  In coordination with Human Services Department's Medicaid Management Information System Replacement (MMISR) project, and using technology enhancement funding, the division is working with a vendor to complete functional and non-functional requirements needed to obtain this system.
  • On October 13, 2017, the Waldrop Settlement Agreement was dismissed with prejudice by the Honorable Judith Herrera, United States District Judge.
DIVISION OF HEALTH IMPROVEMENT
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Division of Health Improvement (DHI) plays a critical role on improving the health outcomes and ensuring the safety of New Mexicans. DHI ensures that healthcare facilities, community based Medicaid waiver providers and community support services deliver safe and effective healthcare and community services in accordance with laws, regulations, and standards of practice.

Who We Serve

DHI works closely with key stakeholders to promote and protect the health, safety, and quality of life of New Mexicans. Our stakeholders include executive and legislative policy makers; providers; facilities and contractors; other state, local, and federal government agencies; advocacy groups; professional organizations; provider associations; various task forces and commissions; and the tax paying public at large.

How We Impact

Key DHI enforcement activities include: conducting various health and safety surveys for both facilities and community-based programs; conducting investigations of alleged abuse, neglect, exploitation, death or environmental hazards; and processing over 44,000 caregiver criminal history screenings annually.

Budget

FY18 OPERATING BUDGET: $12,047,500

  • General Funds: $4,192,600
  • Other Transfers: $3,348,400
  • Federal Funds: $2,613,000
  • Other State Funds: $1,893,500
Accomplishments

During the second quarter of FY18, some of DHI’s accomplishments included:

  • Implemented a staff development program utilizing a monthly "Ted Talk" format.
  • Long-Term Care surveyors completed the training in the new nursing home regulations, which went into effect November 2017.

Health, Facilities, Licensing, and Certification:

  • Completed all required Centers for Medicare and Medicaid health facility surveys:
    • 11 health facility complaint surveys
    • 2 life safety code surveys
    • 6 home health agencies
    • 1 rural health clinic
    • 2 hospice agencies
    • 1 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) facility
    • 1 diagnostic & treatment center
    • 17 Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) surveys 

Community Based Waiver Programs:

  • Held a one-day training for Incident Management Bureau (IMB) Investigators using data from our Quarterly Investigation Quality Review to inform our training curriculum. 
  • Held a week-long Core-Competencies training for seven new IMB Investigators. 
  • Revisions to the draft FY18 Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation Reporting guide for Community-Based Service Providers were completed and the guide will soon be finalized and released for distribution in both Spanish and English.
  • Quality Management Bureau and the Developmental Disabilities and Supports Division (DDSD) have developed new components to be added to the community provider survey tool and a new compliance determination process, which will go into effect on April 1st 2018.
MEDICAL CANNABIS PROGRAM
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Medical Cannabis Program (MCP) was created in 2007 under the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act (the Act). The purpose of this Act is to allow the beneficial use of medical cannabis in a regulated system for alleviating symptoms caused by debilitating medical conditions. New Mexicans with a diagnosed qualifying medical condition are eligible to participate in the Program.

Who We Serve

The Program serves New Mexicans with qualifying medical conditions diagnosed by a health care provider. There are currently 21 qualifying medical conditions:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Epilepsy/Seizure Disorder
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C Infection currently receiving antiviral treatment (proof of current anti-viral treatment required)
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Hospice Care
  • Inclusion Body Myositis
  • Intractable Nausea/Vomiting
  • Inflammatory autoimmune-mediated arthritis
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord, with (proof of objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity required)
  • Painful Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Severe Chronic Pain
  • Severe Anorexia/Cachexia
  • Spasmodic Torticollis (Cervical Dystonia)
  • Ulcerative Colitis
How We Impact

The Program enables the provision of compassionate care for people that have certain illnesses who prefer to use cannabis to alleviate symptoms related to their diagnosis.

Budget

FY18 OPERATING BUDGET: $2,750,000

  • Other State Funds: $2,750,000

Accomplishments

During the second quarter of FY18, some of MCP’s accomplishments included:

  • Gave one educational presentation to 22 law enforcement staff.
  • Gave one medical presentation to a group of nephrologists.
  • Gave one presentation for approximately 30 local town council members and their constituents.  
  • Continued cross-training Licensing and Compliance Manager duties with Patient Services Manager duties.
  • Hired and trained one new data entry clerk to assist with data entry of patient applications.
  • Hired new Medical Director to assist with medical review and approval of patient applications.
  • Implemented strategies to print, fold, and stuff informational patient inserts at the NMDOH mailroom to reduce staff time on patient mailings in the office. 
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