NMDOH FY17 STRATEGIC PLAN ANNUAL SCORECARD

The New Mexico Department of Health Results Scorecard shows the progress we made toward a Healthier New Mexico during fiscal year 2017 (FY17). You can use this Scorecard to learn about the actions we are taking to carry out our FY17-FY19 Strategic Plan. The Scorecard shows what we are doing and how well we are doing it.

A Result (R) is the condition of well-being we desire for the population of New Mexico. An Indicator (I) helps us measure the desired Result in the population. A Program (P) is an organizational unit in our agency that helps us reach the desired Results. A Performance Measure (PM) helps us measure how well a Program is contributing to population health.

Time Period describes the most recent period for which data are available. The Actual Value, Target Value, and Current Trend are for the Time Period shown. Actual Values may show a background color. Green means we met the Target Value. Yellow means we were close to the Target Value. Red means we did not meet the Target Value. The Current Trend shows whether we have been getting better or worse. A green arrow shows the trend is moving in the direction we desire, a red arrow shows the trend is moving away from our desired target, and a black arrow shows that the trend is staying the same. The number next to the arrow shows how many periods in a row the trend has been in the same direction.

FY17-FY19 STRATEGIC PLAN RESULT 1
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Why Is This Important?
I
2014
13.8 per 10,000
14.4 per 10,000
1
I
2016
28.3%
25.4%
1
I
2015
11.4%
13.5%
2
I
2016
16.6%
17.3%
2
I
2016
29.4 per 1,000
25.5 per 1,000
5
I
2016
24.8 per 100,000
25.9 per 100,000
1
I
2016
66.0 per 100,000
58.5 per 100,000
3
I
2016
91.6 per 100,000
96.1 per 100,000
1
I
2016
195.8 per 100,000
164.1 per 100,000
1
I
2016
921 per 100,000
475 per 100,000
0
I
2016
14.4 per 100,000
15.0 per 100,000
1
I
2016
22.2 per 100,000
20.7 per 100,000
1
I
2016
14.4 per 100,000
15.0 per 100,000
1
PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Public Health Division (PHD) fulfills the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) mission by working with individuals, families, communities and partners to improve health, eliminate disparities, respond to health threats, and ensure timely access to quality, culturally competent health care.

Who We Serve

The Public Health Division serves all New Mexicans. PHD staff members promote healthy lifestyle choices in all of their work, and they provide safety net clinical services to New Mexicans who cannot otherwise access these services.

How We Impact

Public Health assures access to health care through case management, and through recruitment and retention efforts including the J-1 Visa Program, licensing of midwives, tax credits for rural health providers, and administering funds for rural primary health care providers throughout the state.

Budget

FY17 OPERATING BUDGET: $180,649,400

  • General Funds: $54,441,000
  • Other Transfers: $16,590,300
  • Federal Funds: $72,586,900
  • Other State Funds: $34,079,200
  • Fund Balance: $2,952,000
Accomplishments

During FY17, some of PHD’s accomplishments included:

  • Albuquerque Metro area WIC offices served over 6,000 lunches over the summer.
  • The New Mexico Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection (BCC) Program provided free, age-appropriate breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to 6,083 low-income women. 
  • With funds from the Brindle Foundation, PHD purchased ad space through National CineMedia to increase awareness of effective birth control methods and clinic locations. Ads ran in February (for Valentine’s Day) and in May (for prom, graduation, and Teen Pregnancy Prevention month). The click through rate for the ads for both campaigns was more than 10 times higher than industry standards.
  • There were 812 successful opioid overdose reversals reported to the Harm Reduction Program in 2016, a 78.5% increase since 2012. This was achieved by distributing 6,430 doses of naloxone and enrolling 2,175 new participants in the program.
  • The Immunization Program and the New Mexico Pediatric Society (NMPS) launched a Human Papilloma Virus initiative to protect youth from HPV-related diseases, helping providers dispel myths about the vaccine and communicate the threat posed by HPV. Statewide coverage rates are steadily rising. 
  • The Prevention of Child abuse and Neglect (PCAN) ECHO pilot was completed on November 15, 2017 concluding with the graduation of 16 Community Health Workers and Home Visitors. 


PM
FY 2017
81.7%
85.0%
3
EPIDEMIOLOGY AND RESPONSE DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Epidemiology and Response Division (ERD) monitors health, provides health information, prevents disease and injury, promotes health and healthy behaviors, responds to public health events, prepares for health emergencies, and provides emergency medical, trauma, vital registration, and sexual assault-related services to New Mexicans.

Who We Serve

ERD serves all New Mexicans, particularly those at risk for injury, disease, and health emergencies, and those in need of emergency medical services, trauma care, birth certificates, and death certificates.

How We Impact

ERD provides services through six bureaus: Vital Records and Health Statistics (VRHS), Health Emergency Management (BHEM), Emergency Medical Systems (EMS), Environmental Health Epidemiology (EHEB), Infectious Disease Epidemiology (IDEB), and Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology (IBEB). In addition, the Community Health Assessment Program (CHAP) operates the online NM Indicator-Based Information System (IBIS) providing data on numerous health-related measures; and the Health Systems Epidemiology Program (HSEP) analyzes and disseminates hospitalization and emergency department data.

VRHS annually registers approximately 26,000 births and 17,000 deaths, and issues over 250,000 birth and death certificates. VRHS also analyzes and distributes data to numerous agencies and organizations to assist them in improving the health of New Mexicans. By working at the state, regional, and local levels through public and private partnerships BHEM enables New Mexicans to prevent, detect, report, respond to, and recover from health-related emergency and disaster incidents. The EMS Bureau administers the Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Trauma, and Stroke/STEMI (Heart Attack) programs. EMS assures licensure for over 8,000 NM Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs).

EHEB conducts surveillance on conditions associated with environmental exposures (e.g. drinking water, air, and soil), provides information to other programs and the public, and implements interventions. IDEB performs surveillance for notifiable infectious diseases and conducts epidemiologic field investigations associated with those diseases, investigating over 10,000 potential cases each year. IDEB and EHEB also provide an on call service, responding to over 5,000 calls annually from healthcare providers, state agencies, educational facilities, the general public, and others seeking advice and recommendations. IBEB analyzes alcohol- and drug-related public health problems; supports substance abuse prevention programs and policy initiatives; provides injury prevention services for infants, children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly; and conducts studies in injury epidemiology. IBEB also conducts the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System annual survey of about 9,000 adults as well as the Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey of about 30,000 mid- and high school students to provide state, county, and school district level data on risk behaviors and resiliency factors.

Budget

FY17 OPERATING BUDGET: $29,006,500

  • General Funds: $13,037,200
  • Other Transfers: $612,300
  • Federal Funds: $14,515,500
  • Other State Funds: $841,500
Accomplishments

During the second quarter of FY17, some of ERD’s accomplishments included:

  • The efforts of various state, federal, local agencies, advocates and other partners were recognized and rewarded by a decline in NM’s drug overdose death rate from 26.4 per 100,000 population in 2014 to 24.8 per 100,000 population in 2015, and an improvement in the death rate from 2nd highest in the nation to 8th highest.
  • The Sexual Violence Prevention Program reached 1,063 students in five counties with evidence-based sexual violence prevention programming designed to increase rejection of rape myth, increase acceptance of flexible gender norms, and decrease acceptance of couple violence. Evaluation of these programs is underway.
  • NMDOH encourages use of New Mexico’s Indicator-based Information System for Public Health (NM-IBIS) to support evidence-based public health program and policy decision-making. During calendar year 2016, there were 62,114 visits to the website. This was a 37% increase over the number of sessions in 2015 and a 111% increase over the number of sessions in 2014.
  • The Emergency Medical Systems (EMS) Bureau is transitioning the state’s emergency medical services data system to the National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS), version 3 standard. This has entailed revamping much of the current system’s data dictionary and working with agencies to assist them in transitioning to the new data submission standard.
  • The Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS) was able to continue to provide excellent customer service to the public despite the significant increase in customers being served due to the need for a birth certificate for the Motor Vehicle Division (MVD) implementation of the Real ID driver’s license.
PM
FY 2017
34.0%
40.0%
3
PM
FY 2017
14.0%
14.0%
1
PM
FY 2017
2.3%
4.6%
3
SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Scientific Laboratory Division (SLD) provides laboratory analysis and scientific expertise for public health policy development, environment and toxicology programs in New Mexico. SLD provides timely identification in order to prevent, identify, and respond to threats to public health and safety from emerging and unusual infectious diseases in humans, animals, water, food, and dairy, as well as chemical and radiological hazards in drinking water systems and environmental water, air, and soil. In addition, the laboratory performs drug testing and provides expert witness testimony for forensic investigations of DWI/DUID and cause of death from drugs and infectious disease. SLD is the primacy bioterrorism and chemical terrorism response laboratory for the state and provides training for clinical laboratories throughout New Mexico.

Who We Serve

New Mexico statute dictates that the Scientific Laboratory Division is the primacy laboratory for the New Mexico Department of Health, the New Mexico Environment Department, and the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, as well as the testing and regulatory authority for impaired driving testing.

How We Impact

The Scientific Laboratory Division (SLD) is New Mexico’s official 1) public health, 2) environmental monitoring and 3) forensic toxicology laboratory. In the above roles, the Scientific Laboratory Division operates the following programs:

  • Infectious disease reference testing laboratory for NMDOH, NM hospitals and clinical labs;
  • Primacy NM regulatory drinking water testing laboratory for EPA and NM Environment Department;
  • Regulatory air testing laboratory for NM Environment Department and City of Albuquerque;
  • Primacy NM regulatory dairy testing laboratory for FDA and NM Department of Agriculture;
  • Veterinary infectious disease reference testing laboratory for the NMD Ag’s, Veterinary Diagnostic Services;
  • Food borne infectious disease testing laboratory;
  • Certification inspectors for private dairy and dairy testing laboratories for the NM Environment Department and the NM Dept. Agriculture;
  • DWI/DUID alcohol and drug testing laboratory;
  • State toxicology expert witnesses for DWI/DUID criminal cases;
  • Certifying authority for NM law enforcement officers for breath alcohol testing;
  • Bio- and chemical terrorism response laboratory for New Mexico;
  • Disease and drug testing laboratory for the NM Office of the Medical Examiner.
Budget

FY17 OPERATING BUDGET: $12,479,600

  • General Funds: $7,575,000
  • Other Transfers: $1,168,400
  • Federal Funds: $2,368,000
  • Other State Funds: $1,368,200
Accomplishments

During FY17, some of SLD’s accomplishments included: 

Laboratory-wide:

  • Completed a Public Health Laboratory System Improvement Program follow-up assessment, which included all of SLD's partner agencies - One of only five states to accomplish this task.  

Chemistry Bureau:

  • Received and installed replacements for eight instruments over 10 years of age.
  • Laboratory was approved for 3-year participation in the  Environmental Protection Agency’s Unregulated Contaminants Monitoring Rule (UCMR) project.
  • SLD's Radiochemistry Program received re-certification status for Drinking Water testing following inspection by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Biological Sciences Bureau:

  • Increased laboratory testing capacity with the introduction of three new tests:  Bacterial Sequencing, Whole Genome Sequencing (for foodborne bacteria) and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption - Time of Flight organism identification.
  • Replaced the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test(r) system with the Geenius(r) system for confirmation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.
  • Completed an annual inspection by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Federal Select Agent Program's Division of Select Agents & Toxins.

Toxicology Bureau:

  • Introduced a quantitative test for buprenorphine, a drug used in opioid addiction and pain treatment.
OFFICE OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Office of Facilities Management (OFM) fulfills the NMDOH mission by providing:

  • Programs in mental health, substance abuse, long-term care, and physical rehabilitation in both facility and community-based settings;
  • Safety net services throughout New Mexico.
Who We Serve

OFM oversees six healthcare facilities and one community program. Most individuals served by NMDOH facilities have either complex medical conditions or psychiatric disorders that manifest in violent behaviors, and private sector providers are either unable or unwilling to serve these complex individuals, many of whom are remanded to NMDOH facilities by court order.

How We Impact

OFM staff cares for both, New Mexico adult and adolescent residents, who need continuous care 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a-year.

Accomplishments

During FY17, some of OFM’s accomplishments included:

  • Turquoise Lodge Hospital received approval for its Intensive Outpatient Program. The Joint Commission is expected to survey in FY18; 1,180 inpatient admissions; improved quality of medical detox and social rehab program by increasing evidence based group programming.
  • Sequoyah Adolescent Treatment Center renovated four lodges improving living conditions and creating a “home like” environment.
  • Los Lunas Community Program is in full compliance with service standards at their Intermediate Care Facility for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Services and Developmental Disability Waiver Services.
  • New Mexico Rehabilitation Center recruited and hired an Administrator; transitioned to Integrated Dual Disorder Treatment model.
  • New Mexico Behavioral Health Institute completed surveys for Long-Term Care, Adult Psychiatric Division, Center for Adolescent Relationship Exploration, and Community-Based Services; 95% patient satisfaction with care and services; 94% patient satisfaction with feeling safe.
  • Fort Bayard Medical Center implemented a music and memory program in the Veteran's unit demonstrating positive results of patient behavior; psychiatric technicians now helping with behaviorally challenged residents, which helps free up Certified Nursing Assistants.
  • New Mexico State Veteran’s Home's Memory Care Unit painted a mural on the door and walls reducing attraction to the exit door.
Budget

FY17 OPERATING BUDGET: $140,535,800

  • General Funds: $60,050,700
  • Other Transfers: $1,114,000
  • Federal Funds: $7,787,500
  • Other State Funds: $71,583,600
PM
FY 2017
24.0%
10.0%
0
DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES AND SUPPORTS DIVISION
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) effectively administers a system of person-centered community supports and services that promotes positive outcomes for all stakeholders.

Who We Serve

DDSD is the primary state agency that funds community services and supports for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities and their families in New Mexico.

How We Impact

DDSD's primary focus is on assisting individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities and their families in exercising their right to make choices, grow and contribute to their community.

Budget

FY17 OPERATING BUDGET: $160,671,900

  • General Funds: $147,407,700
  • Other Transfers: $8,845,000
  • Federal Funds: $2,819,200
  • Other State Funds: $1,600,000
Accomplishments

During FY17, some of DDSD’s accomplishments included:

  • Engaged in developing a Client Data Management System in coordination with NM HSD’s Medicaid Management Information System-Replacement (MMIS-R) project
  • Engaged Gartner Consulting’s Public Sector Health and Human Services Practice to finalize business requirements, conduct a feasibility study and procurement strategy
  • The Developmental Disabilities (DD) Waiver was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for another five years
  • The Know Your Rights Campaign (KYR) and Steering Committee provided outreach and education through a number of activities and forums
  • Training conducted for the Division of Health Improvement (DHI) with advocates, DDSD, DDPC and Attorney General’s office
  • Conducted nine trainings across the state on the revised Clinical Criteria for the DD Waiver
  • Implemented the Therap Health Record Audit for Jackson Class Members
  • Completed the first full quarter of implementation of the Backlog Plan, which systemically addresses the backlog of applications for individuals on the Central Registry. During this quarter, 296 applications in the Central Registry were moved from a “Start” status to either “Complete – Awaiting Allocation” or “Closed” for reasons other than allocation. Also during this quarter, 126 new registrations were added to the Central Registry. This quarter marks the first decline in the number of individuals on the Central Registry without a large allocation group. 
DIVISION OF HEALTH IMPROVEMENT
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Division of Health Improvement (DHI) plays a critical role on improving the health outcomes and ensuring the safety of New Mexicans. DHI ensures that healthcare facilities, community based Medicaid waiver providers and community support services deliver safe and effective healthcare and community services in accordance with laws, regulations, and standards of practice.

Who We Serve

DHI works closely with key stakeholders to promote and protect the health, safety, and quality of life of New Mexicans. Our stakeholders include executive and legislative policy makers; providers; facilities and contractors; other state, local, and federal government agencies; advocacy groups; professional organizations; provider associations; various task forces and commissions; and the tax paying public at large.

How We Impact

Key DHI enforcement activities include: conducting various health and safety surveys for both: facilities and community-based programs; conducting investigations of alleged abuse, neglect, exploitation, death or environmental hazards, and processing over 44,000 caregiver criminal history screenings annually.

Budget

FY17 OPERATING BUDGET: $13,039,400

  • General Funds: $4,421,800
  • Other Transfers: $4,188,800
  • Federal Funds: $2,517,000
  • Other State Funds: $1,911,800
Accomplishments

During FY17, some of DHI's accomplishments were:

  • General Division Accomplishments
    • Completed its website upgrade and migration to nmhealth.org. The updated DHI website is more user friendly and simpler to find key resources and information.
  • Community Programs:  Incident Management Bureau
    • The Incident Management Bureau (IMB) successfully completed five objectives for disengagement with Jackson litigation requirements.
  • Health Facility and Licensing:  District Operations Bureau
    • Completed its first year of customer service feedback surveys from nursing homes. This information has helped DHI develop a culture change resulting in a greater “Customer Service Focus," in better cooperation with surveyors on survey, and more letters of commendation to surveyors for their friendly and professional attitude.
    • DHI has made significant improvement in the time to complete and distribute long-term care facilities survey reports of deficiencies. Over 90% of reports are issued within 10 days of exit during the fourth quarter.
    • All long-term care surveyors are receiving training on the various electronic medical record systems used in nursing homes. Training has allowed survey teams to navigate these systems in a more efficient way reducing onsite survey time.
  • Health Facility and Licensing:  Program Operations Bureau
    • DHI is on track to complete all federally required Tier I, II, and III surveys and will be moving on to complete more of the Tier IV workload.
MEDICAL CANNABIS PROGRAM
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
What We Do

The Medical Cannabis Program (MCP) was created in 2007 under the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act (the Act). The purpose of this Act is to allow the beneficial use of medical cannabis in a regulated system for alleviating symptoms caused by debilitating medical conditions. New Mexicans with a diagnosed qualifying medical condition are eligible to participate in the Program.

Who We Serve

The Program serves New Mexicans with qualifying medical conditions diagnosed by a health care provider. There are currently 21 qualifying medical conditions:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C Infection currently receiving antiviral treatment (proof of current anti-viral treatment required)
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Hospice Care
  • Inclusion Body Myositis
  • Intractable Nausea/Vomiting
  • Inflammatory autoimmune-mediated arthritis
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord, with (proof of objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity required)
  • Painful Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Severe Chronic Pain
  • Severe Anorexia/Cachexia
  • Spasmodic Torticollis (Cervical Dystonia)
  • Ulcerative Colitis
How We Impact

The Program enables the provision of compassionate care for people that have certain illnesses who prefer to use cannabis to alleviate symptoms related to their diagnosis.

Budget

FY17 OPERATING BUDGET: $2,784,879

  • Other State Funds: $2,784,879

Accomplishments

During FY17, some of MCP's accomplishments included:

  • Hired and trained six new Information and Records Clerks to process and approve applications.
  • Developed standard operating procedures (SOPs) for Patient Services staff.
  • Completed multiple trainings on operating procedures and BioTrackTHC software for all Patient Services staff.
  • Completed training on customer service for all MCP staff.
  • Conducted two educational presentations to about 35 medical providers and four educational presentations to about 170 law enforcement officers and lawyers.
  • Worked with BioTrackTHC to decrease printing time for patient registry cards from about four minutes per card to two minutes per card.
Scorecard Result Program Indicator Performance Measure Action Actual Value Target Value Tag S R I P PM A m/d/yy m/d/yyyy