DAIL Scorecard

Summary of DAIL outcomes and indicators, with division programs and performance measures.

Outcomes we want for Vermonters
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
Why Is This Important?
I
2016
23%
18%
1
5%
I
2016
59%
90%
3
-14%
I
2016
26percentage
28percentage
1
13%
I
2015
12.28percentage
14.71percentage
1
6%
I
2015
9.6
8.0
1
-16%
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
Why Is This Important?
R
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
Why Is This Important?
How DAIL contributes
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Time
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Value
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% Change
What We Do

The Older Americans Act (OAA) Nutrition Services Program promotes the health and well being of older adults through access to nutritious meals, social contacts, nutrition screening, nutrition education, nutrition counseling and other services.

Who We Serve

Persons eligible for the OAA Nutrition Services Home Delivered Meals Program are age 60 or over who are unable to leave home without considerable difficulty and/or assistance; and experience a physical or mental condition making them unable to obtain food or prepare meals on a temporary or permanent basis.  Also eligible are the spouse, regardless of age, of an eligible person, and individuals under age 60 years of age, with a disability, who reside with an eligible person.

Preference is given to individuals who live in rural communities, are low-income, minority, limited English proficiency and at risk for institutional care.

How We Impact

Nutrition plays an important role in promoting good health and preventing disease.  For many older adults nutrition is integral to the management of chronic conditions and recovery from illness or hospitalization.  Participants in the Nutrition Services Program receive home delivered meals that provide at least 1/3 of the daily Recommended Dietary Allowances and follow the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 

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Time
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Actual
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Target
Value
Current
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% Change
What We Do

The Choices for Care program provides long term services and supports to eligible Vermonters. These services provide support to allow Vermonters to choose where they want to receive their services, with ability to access services in the community or in a nursing facility.

 

Who We Serve

Choices for Care offers long term care services to eligible Vermonters who need nursing home level of care and who need Medicaid to pay for their care. 

How We Impact

The Choices for Care program provides a full array of long-term services and supports for older Vermonters and adults with physical disabilities. The Choices for Care program supports Vermonters to live in the setting of their choice, pursuing their individual goals and preferences within their chosen communities.

P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
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Baseline
% Change
What We Do

The Choices for Care Moderate Needs Program is an option for individuals who may not meet nursing home level of care but require some services to assist them to remain independent in their home, preventing a more intense level of service.  Services may include case management, homemaker, adult day, flexible funds.

Who We Serve

We serve Vermonters 18 years of age or older who meet both clinical and financial eligibility criteria and have a functional limitation resulting from a physical condition including stroke, dementia, TBI, and similar conditions or associated with aging.

How We Impact

The Choices for Care program provides a full array of long-term services and supports for older Vermonters and adults with physical disabilities. The Choices for Care program supports Vermonters to live in the setting of their choice, pursuing their individual goals and preferences within their chosen communities.

Budget information
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do
Who We Serve
How We Impact
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do

Project SEARCH prepares student-interns during their last year of high school or transition age adults with technical skills taught through several training rotations within a host business which lead to competitive employment upon high school graduation.

Who We Serve

Transition age youth age 18 to 26 who are eligible for developmental disabilities services.

How We Impact

The Project SEARCH model assures a smooth transition into the Vermont workforce for transition age youth by providing marketable technical skills and person-centered job placement.

Budget information

PRIMARY APPROPRIATION #: 3460050000 (DDSD) – $259,394

TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET 2019 (DAIL): $259,394

In addition, each school district listed above contributes a per pupil tuition via Special Education funding which, in collaboration with the DAIL budget, covers the expense of the program.

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Time
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Actual
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Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do

The Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DBVI) is the designated state unit to provide vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to eligible Vermonters who are blind and visually impaired. DBVI's Mission is to support the efforts of Vermonters who are blind and visually impaired to achieve or sustain their economic independence, self reliance, and social integration to a level consistent with their interests, abilities and informed choices.

Who We Serve

DBVI serves Vermonters who are blind and visually impaired.

How We Impact

DBVI supports Vermonters who are blind and visually impaired to achieve or sustain their economic independence, self reliance, and social integration to a level consistent with their interests, abilities and informed choices.

Budget information

Total Program Budget

FY 2018: $1,451,457

FY 2019 Proposed: $1,451,457

PRIMARY APPROPRIATION #: 3460030000

DBVI is currently in the baseline year of new Performance Measures as part of the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. Once new baselines are determined in FFY2018, targets will be identified for each measure. The previous Standards and Indicators ended in FFY 2016.

 




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Actual
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What We Do

Division Philosophy

DVR's mission is to help Vermonters with disabilities prepare for, obtain, and maintain meaningful employment and to help employers recruit, train and retain employees with disabilities. Consumer choice and self-direction are core values that drive DVR’s approach to providing services and developing new programs. DVR's ability to help jobseekers succeed also depends on clearly understanding needs of our other customer – employers. To that end, DVR plays an important facilitating role in Creative Workforce Solutions (CWS), an Agency of Human Services (AHS) initiative that builds on DVR’s initial employer outreach work.

Division Overview

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation serves people with disabilities in Vermont who face barriers to employment. We help VR consumers figure out what work will work for them through careful assessment, counseling and guidance from our expert staff. We capitalize on our extensive networks in the employer community to create job opportunities and make good placements that match employer needs with jobseeker skills, and help employers retain staff with disabilities. We use our financial resources within Vermont communities to support our consumers as they transition to stable employment, and our employers as they try out new workers.


Who We Serve

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation serves people with disabilities in Vermont who face barriers to employment.

How We Impact

Staff and Partners

DVR believes in collaborating with other service providers to reach people facing the greatest challenges to employment. As a result, DVR has created innovative partnerships to serve youth, offenders, veterans, people receiving public benefits, and those who need ongoing support in order to work.

Recent Developments and Accomplishments

Core Teams – One way in which DVR provides effective services statewide is through the Core Transition Teams, which increase capacity at the local level to develop, provide, and manage an effective transition process for students. Recognizing that communities will have their own individual approach, it is important that all high school staff, Agency of Human Services (AHS) staff, and community partners have access to the support of a Local Core Transition Team.

Spirit of the ADA Awards – Each year during National Disability Employment Awareness Month, the Governor's Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities (GCEPD) selects businesses from across the state who exemplify best practices in recruiting, promoting and retaining Vermonters with disabilities. Award winners are recognized in their local communities, and agree to work with the Committee to share their experience and strategies with other businesses. Business Account Managers from Creative Workforce Solutions (CWS) and the Committee work closely to gather nominations from a variety of programs and disability groups, and develop ideal dates, locations, agendas and talking points for the ceremonies.

Assistive Technology (AT) and DVR – The AT program and DVR strengthened their partnership by providing three dedicated AT staff for consultations and training up to 20 hours each per week. These services are available for all VR consumers who are working on goals related to their IPE, which is in addition to the AT Act Core Services (demos, equipment loans, reuse, resource information) available to all Vermonters.

Pre-Employment Transition Services – The implementation of the Pre-Employment Transition Services mandate has had a major impact on the DVR caseload. To illustrate, in FFY 2012, less than 3% of the consumers who signed an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) with DVR were under the age of 17. In FFY 2016, that figure grew to nearly 15% of new plans signed (see chart below). Furthermore, the median age of individuals with an IPE went from 35 in FFY 2012 to 30 in FFY 2016.

Future Directions

Linking Learning to Careers Project (LLC) – In September 2016, DVR was awarded a $9M, 5-year Federal grant to implement and evaluate an innovative model for the transition of students with disabilities to early career success, including paid, competitive employment, postsecondary school enrollment, and improved confidence to achieve career goals.

The State as a Model Employer – On March 23, 2016, Governor Shumlin signed an Executive Order establishing a “Disability Employment Working Group” comprised of representatives from DAIL, DHR and members of the Governor’s Workforce Equity and Diversity Committee. They were charged with developing a model to help State agencies recruit, train and retain workers with disabilities to both diversify and meet the needs of Vermont’s “greying” workforce. Beginning in January of 2017, CWS will pilot the model in the Barre-Berlin-Montpelier corridor, with an eye to statewide expansion in the Spring of 2017.

Employee-driven Training – Without an intentional training effort, the valuable expertise of field staff often remains in district offices, unavailable to others. DVR is developing a process wherein staff can share their experience and best practices Statewide by exploring employee-driven trainings. This has an added professional development element, giving staff experience developing and communicating curricula to their peers all while honing presentation and writing skills.

Programs and Services

Vocational Rehabilitation Services – DVR services to jobseekers are tailored to the person and driven by his or her own interests, job goals and needs. Each person meets regularly with his or her VR counselor, who helps to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and manages the services and supports needed to realize the person’s career goals. The core services of vocational assessment, counseling and guidance, job training, and job placement provided by DVR staff and partners are enhanced with a range of purchased services and supports.

Placement Services – DVR counselors benefit from dedicated Employment Consultants who provide job development, job placement, and workplace supports to help people find and keep jobs. DVR has longstanding partnerships with Designated and Specialized Services Agencies (DAs and SSAs) to provide supported employment services to people with significant disabilities. DVR also has an ongoing partnership with the Vermont Association of Business, Industry, and Rehabilitation (VABIR) to provide employment services to DVR customers.

Results

How many people we serve: 9,254 Individuals served

How well we serve them – Survey Results:

Conducted approximately every two years, 2016 results show that for our customers:

Nationally, Vermont DVR ranks #1 among general VR agencies in:

P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do
Who We Serve
How We Impact
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do
Who We Serve
How We Impact
PM
2016
100%
95%
1
23%
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do

The Vermont Traumatic Brain Injury Program supports Vermonters with a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury, diverting or helping them return from hospitals and rehabilitation facilities to a community-based setting. This program is focused on rehabilitation and driven by participant choice, supporting individuals to achieve their optimum level of independence and to return to work.

Who We Serve

The Vermont Traumatic Brain Injury Program serves Medicaid eligible Vermonters with a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

How We Impact

The Vermont Traumatic Brain Injury Program helps Medicaid eligible Vermonters with moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries to achieve their optimum level of independence and to return to work.

Budget information

Total Program Budget

FY 2018: $5,647,336

FY 2019 proposed: $6,005,225


PRIMARY APPROPRIATION #: 3460070000




P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do

HomeShare Vermont provides screening, matching and ongoing support services, pairing Vermonters who wish to live in their own homes (hosts) with others who are looking for affordable housing (guests).  

Who We Serve

HomeShare Vermont serves Vermonters who are looking to share housing for mutual benefit. Most people sharing their homes (hosts) are seniors or people with disabilities, and many people looking for housing (guests) are financially challenged by market rents or are in housing transitions.  Twenty percent of people served come from outside our service Counties (Chittenden, Addison, Franklin, and Grand Isle), most of whom are interested in moving into one of these Counties.

How We Impact

HomeShare Vermont:

  • Helps make housing more affordable for Vermonters
  • Helps older Vermonters and Vermonters with disabilities live in their own homes
  • Helps improve the quality of life for homesharing participants, who report that they feel safer, less lonely, eat better, and feel healthier 
Budget information

HomeShare VT grants:

SFY2019     SFY2018    SFY2017    SFY2016

$179.940    $179,940   $179,940   $179,940

MCO Investment Expenditures for both homesharing programs: includes indirect allocations to GC MCO (per DAIL business office):  

SFY2019 Plan   SFY2018 est.    SFY2017 actual  SFY2016 actual

$342,000          $341,000          $340,882           $339,966

 

P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do

Home Share Now facilitates mutually beneficial homeshare matches.  Home Share Now’s matching process includes in-person interviews, housing and personal references, employment verification, background screenings, facilitated introductions, a trial period, and written agreements.  Home Share Now provides conflict coaching, problem solving, facilitation, written agreements, and mediation for the duration of the match.

Who We Serve

Home Share Now serves Vermonters in Washington and Orange Counties and a few outlying towns. Most people sharing their homes (hosts) are seniors or persons with disabilities, and many people looking for housing (guests) are financially challenged by market rents or are in a housing transition. 

How We Impact

Home Share Now:

  • Helps make housing more affordable for Vermonters   
  • Helps older Vermonters and Vermonters with disabilities stay in their own homes
  • Helps improve the quality of life for homesharing participants, who report that they feel safer, less lonely, eat better, and feel healthier
Budget information

Home Share Now Grants:

SFY2019     SFY2018    SFY2017    SFY2016

$147,223    $147,223   $147,223   $147,223  

MCO Investment Expenditures for both homesharing programs: includes indirect allocations to GC MCO (per DAIL business office):  

SFY2019 Plan   SFY2018 est.    SFY2017 actual  SFY2016 actual

$342,000          $341,000          $340,882           $339,966

DAIL
P
Time
Period
Actual
Value
Target
Value
Current
Trend
Baseline
% Change
What We Do

SASH coordinates the resources of social-service agencies, community health providers and nonprofit housing organizations to support Vermonters who choose to live independently at home. Individualized, on-site support is provided by a Wellness Nurse and a SASH Care Coordinator.

Who We Serve

SASH serves older adults as well as people with special needs who receive Medicare support. SASH touches the lives of approximately 5,000 people throughout Vermont.

How We Impact

Benefits to SASH Participants:

  • Improved quality of life

  • Comprehensive health and wellness assessments

  • Individualized Healthy Living Plans

  • Money savings through preventive health care

  • Regular check-ins by caring staff

  • Health coaching and access to wellness nurses

  • Help in planning for successful transitions (e.g., following hospitalization), navigating long-term care options and during a crisis

  • Access to prevention and wellness programs

  • Support in self-managing medications

Budget information

SASH grants:

SFY2019    SFY2018    SFY2017   SFY2016

$974,023   $974,023   $974,023  $974,023

MCO Investment expenditures for SASH: includes indirect allocations to GC MCO (per DAIL business office):

SFY2019 plan   SFY2018 est.   SFY2017 actual   SFY2016 actual

$1,024,000       $1,023,000      $1,022,170          $1,013,283   

PM
2018
52
44
1
26%
PM
2018
25
0
0%
Scorecard Result Program Indicator Performance Measure Action Actual Value Target Value Tag S R I P PM A m/d/yy m/d/yyyy