Frederick County Results for Child Well-Being

This scorecard tracks the county-level results and indicators for Frederick County.

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Story Behind the Curve
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Why Is This Important?

The hours from 3 to 6 p.m. are the peak time for juvenile crime and victimization. Youth left unsupervised after school are more likely to engage in criminal activity, initiate sexual activity at an earlier age, and abuse substances, including alcohol and cigarettes. Unfortunately, Frederick County’s youth are more likely to be at risk for unsupervised time and dangerous activities because working parents in Frederick County spend significantly more time commuting than other Maryland or U.S. residents (U.S. Census Bureau). Recent data shows that 1 in 6 working residents in the county commutes over 60 minutes each day.

A decade of research and evaluation studies confirms that children and youth who participate in after school programs can reap a host of positive benefits in a number of interrelated outcome areas – academic, social-emotional, prevention, and health and wellness. These are the skills that many suggest are necessary for youth to succeed in the 21st Century global economy and world.

Story Behind the Curve



Various data points demonstrate the need for intervention programs for youth with criminal justice system interactions. The quantitative assessment of need regarding the juvenile arrest rate (314.4) and 12-month juvenile rearrests (28.6%) indicate that Frederick County is doing well in these areas compared to the state averages (22% less and 38% less, respectively). These indicators may also speak to the effectiveness of the Frederick County Juvenile Entry Diversion Initiative program in preventing arrests or rearrests. However, incidences of bullying, harassment and intimidation have risen dramatically and are 50% higher than the state average. Gang activity and negative peer influences were identified as critical issues by focus group participants and both the key leader and general community respondents on the online surveys. These indicators, while not directly related to arrests, may signify that preventative measures are warranted, or that the incidence of juvenile arrests may soon be on the rise. The number of pre-adjudicated CINS referrals has been on the rise since FY13 (from 26 in FY13 to 81 in FY15), which also indicates a potential future increase in need. The number of referred juvenile offenders has increased less dramatically (from 318 in FY13 to 341 in FY15).


Strategies to improve these indicators

FY 2016 LMB strategies to improve these indicators:

•Frederick County Out of School Programs (which promote pro-social development, school and community engagement, and parent involvement)

•Juvenile Entry Diversion Initiative (JEDI)

•Active involvement of LMB members/LMB staff in Public Health and Safety Collaborative

•Locally funded LMB program such Children's Mobile Crisis and Health-E Kids: Mental Health

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Story Behind the Curve
Strategies to improve these indicators
Data Discussion
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Story Behind the Curve
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Data Discussion
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Why Is This Important?

Studies have shown that school success is closely tied to parental involvement. A synthesis of research on parental involvement over the past decade found that, regardless of family income or background, students with involved parents are more likely to:

  • Earn higher grades and test scores, and enroll in higher-level programs
  • Be promoted, pass their classes, and earn credits
  • Attend school regularly
  • Have better social skills, show improved behavior, and adapt well to school
  • Graduate and go on to postsecondary
Story Behind the Curve

The need for increased parental involvement in the current delivery system was identified as an area needing improvement in the community needs assessment conducted by the LMB. A majority of providers indicated (53.7%) that there is not sufficient family involvement in the current service delivery system. Lack of parental/family engagement can lead to children not being successful in school and not attending school as required.

Truancy has been clearly identified as one of the early warning signs that youth are headed for potential delinquent activity, social isolation, and/or educational failure. According to the most recent data from the 2016 Frederick County Needs Assessment the truancy rate of 7.6% remains higher than surrounding jurisdictions, including Carroll, and Howard Counties.

Strategies to improve these indicators

FY 2015 LMB strategies to improve these indicators:

•Frederick County Out of School Programs (which promote pro-socialdevelopment , school and community engagement, and parent involvement)

•Locally funded LMB programs such Children's Mobile Crisis and Health-E Kids: Mental Health

Data Discussion
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Story Behind the Curve
Strategies to improve these indicators
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Why Is This Important?

Creating a human service system that supports family stability and economic independence is a goal of the Frederick County Local Management Board and its subcommittees. The system must be flexible, responsive and encourage community-based solutions to problems families face. Community-based intervention programs enhance the likelihood that high-risk children can remain with their families. The LMB and its partners have demonstrated a commitment to providing intensive supports for youth and families at risk of out of home placement, which is reflected in the jurisdiction’s out of home placement data.

The need for affordable and accessible programming for youth in Frederick County was identified as a barrier to children and families in the community needs assessment conducted by the LMB. Lack of transportation was a consistent theme throughout the needs assessment. Seventeen (17%) percent of survey respondents indicated that transportation was a significant barrier to accessing care. These barriers result in children not receiving necessary mental health, substance abuse, medication, and/or behavior management treatment. Lack of treatment and critical intervention can result in out-of-home placement..
Story Behind the Curve

According to the most recent data from the Governor's Office for Children-Results and Indicators, Frederick County experienced 5.1 out-of-home placements per 1,000 children in 2015 .This indicator has increased since 2012, when the rate was 8.1. Frederick County has continued to show a steady decline in the number of out-of-home placements (OOH) for the past three years. Frederick County has placed a heavy emphasis on home and community-based services in order to meet the needs of the children and families in their natural environments and prevent out-of-home (OOH) placements.

Strategies to improve these indicators

FY2016 LMB strategies to improve these indicators:

  • Juvenile Entry Diversion Initiative (JEDI)
  • Frederick County Local Care Team
  • Other LMB administered programs such Children's Mobile Crisis and Health-E Kids: Mental Health
Scorecard Result Program Indicator Performance Measure Action Actual Value Target Value Tag S R I P PM A m/d/yy m/d/yyyy